Newsletter 113 (This Month at Christison Rare Books)

Dear Collector

This month we offer a marvellous selection of books, with lots of Hunting, Natural History, Geology and Mining.  Several of the books give one an almost palpable sense of contact with the protagonists and the events they describe.

When next you sit down to a plate of hake and chips, think of John Gilchrist, the enthusiastic marine biologist appointed to investigate the fishing potential of the Agulhas Bank.  In 1897 a small steam trawler, dubbed the Pieter Faure, was delivered from Scotland for Gilchrist’s work.  In no time at all, Gilchrist was reporting great hake stocks off Dassen Island, and had discovered the riches of sole east of Cape Agulhas.  This month we offer his impressive Report of the Marine Biologist for the Year 1898, which records an important voyage of the Pieter Faure.  There are also some pamphlets from Gilchrist on offer, signed for, or by, his friend and collaborator Keppel H. Barnard.  According to the book A History of Scientific Endeavour in South Africa, “At sea [Gilchrist] was as enthusiastic and stimulating as ever but back in Cape Town, wrapped in scientific thoughts, he was the epitome of an absent-minded professor.  He passed a lady he thought he knew one day and courteously raised his hat; but she was indignant.  ‘Surely, John, you know your own wife?’”

The man who succeeded Gilchrist and Barnard as the preeminent fish expert in South Africa was J L B Smith.  Fishermen enjoyed his company, because he could not only identify unusual fish but also say what baits to use, and where the fish could be found.  Have a look at the rare volume of The South African Angler for 1947-48, and marvel at what anglers were catching in those days.

One of the most famous scientists our country has ever produced was Alex du Toit, credited with the discovery of continental drift.  We have his own signed copy of Science in South Africa this month, along with his famous work Geology of South Africa, and several issues of the Alex L. du Toit Memorial Lecture.

It is a little-publicised fact that the famous scientist Isaac Newton wrote more about religion than he did about science.  In his works on the Bible, many of which were not published until long after his death, he reached conclusions that were often at odds with Church doctrine.  One of Newton’s religious works was Observations upon the Prophecies of Daniel.  This month we offer Bishop Robert Gray’s copy.  Considering Gray’s position as the representative of orthodoxy in the Colenso heresy case, it is intriguing that he had this book in his possession.

The many hunting books in this month’s list include such highlights as the first edition of Scully’s Lodges in the Wilderness, the first edition of Bulpin’s The Ivory Trail, David Enderby Blunt’s Elephant, Das Neves’ A Hunting Expedition to the Transvaal, the first edition of W D M Bell’sKaramojo Safari, and a limited edition facsimile of A Breath from the Veldt, by John Guille Millais.

Contact between the Portuguese and Boers receives copious attention in O J O Ferreira’s Serpa Pinto amongst Boer and Brit, D W Kruger’s Die weg na die see, and J B de Waal’s Die rol van João Albasini in die geskiedenis van die Transvaal.  Travelling further afield, we have an early report on irrigation in Kenya, and volumes from the Oppenheimer Series: The Northern Goldfields Diaries of Thomas Baines, and The Barotseland Journal of James Stevenson-Hamilton.

The natural history books this month are thrilling.  They include Linder and Kurzweil’s Orchids of Southern AfricaPennington’s Butterflies of Southern Africa, and The Flora Capensis of Jakob and Johann Philipp Breyne, by Mary Gunn and Enid du Plessis.

As always, we hope we have found something to tempt you.

Best wishes,
Lindsay and Wendy

 

AFRIKAANS

Cloete, T. T.: Onversadig (Cape Town: Tafelberg, 2011) 212 x 136 mm; laminated pictorial wrappers; pp. 196.  Corners very slightly curled; occasional fox spot.  Very good condition.  Afrikaans text.  “Shortlisted for UJ Prize for Creative Writing in Afrikaans 2011.  In this volume of poetry T.T. Cloete extends his craft in a remarkable fashion. He articulates with technical ingenuity the human incapacity to fathom the mystery of creation and of his own existence.” – The publishers. £10.00

COLLECTING

Godfrey, Denis: Antiques and Bygones (Cape Town: Howard Timmins, 1967) 8vo; original yellow boards, lettered in black on spine; no dustwrapper; pp. (xiv) + 123, incl. index; plates.  Light soiling to boards; sporadic foxing; small tape stains to gutter between copyright page and dedication page; trace of fingering to front free endpaper.  Good.  “This is an exciting book by Denis Godfrey for collectors of antiques and objects of Africana interest.  The author had great success with The Enchanted Door, a work on African book collecting which sold out two editions in a short time.  Antiques and Bygones is about objects rather than books, and might be termed a notebook for South African collectors.  The subjects dealt with concisely and clearly include furniture, colour prints, silver, Persian rugs, jewellery, beds, glass, pewter, dolls, chamber pots and many other items. … Denis Godfrey, who was born in the Transkei of 1820 Settler ancestry, is a Johannesburg journalist and has written and lectured extensively on Africana, which he began collecting 25 years ago.” £5.00

CAPE

Boeseken, Anna J.: Die Nederlandse kommissarisse en die 18de eeuse samelewing aan die Kaap[1944 Archives Year Book for South African History, Seventh Year] (Pretoria: Ministry of the Interior, Union of South Africa, [1945]) Archives Year Book for South African History, Seventh Year.  Large 8vo; original dark green cloth, lettered in gilt on spine; pp. xv + (i) + 253; some plates.  Cloth very slightly rubbed; corners turned; bump to fore-edge of lower board; light browning; trace of foxing.  Good condition.  The first comprehensive study of the work of the commissaries of the Dutch East India Company, who visited the Cape of Good Hope in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.  Afrikaans text. £20.00

Cullinan, Patrick: Robert Jacob Gordon 1743-1795. The Man and his Travels at the Cape (Cape Town: Struik Winchester, 1992) 4to; original red cloth, lettered in gilt on spine and upper cover; laminated pictorial dustwrapper and matching laminated pictorial slipcase; pp. 215 + (i), incl. index; maps; lavishly illustrated with contemporary artwork, largely in full colour.  Near fine condition.  A beautiful book.  “This is the first full-length biography, in any language, of the remarkable eighteenth-century soldier, scientist and explorer Robert Jacob Gordon (1743-1795).  It examines his early life, his explorations in southern Africa, his military service at the Cape, and concludes with his tragic suicide after the surrender of the Cape to the British 1795.  Though of Scottish descent, he was first and foremost a Dutchman, serving initially in the elite Scots Brigade and later with the Dutch East India Company, in whose service he rose to the rank of colonel and commanded the Cape garrison from 1780 to 1795. … Quoting extensively from his own translation of Gordon’s papers and journals, as well as from numerous contemporary sources, the author skilfully reveals a man of discipline, integrity and humanity, whose resourceful and enquiring mind was indefatigable in its pursuit of knowledge.” £40.00

Greig, George: Facts connected with the stopping of the South African Commercial Advertiser. A facsimile reproduction of the original handbill and its first postscript together with a transcription of the subsequent postscripts (Cape Town: Africana Connoisseurs Press, 1963) Number 80 of an edition limited to 510 copies.  4to; original maroon rexine, lettered in gilt on upper cover; pp. 29.  Somewhat foxed.  Very good condition.  ‘The story of the struggle for the freedom of the press in South Africa is well known, but the broadsheet “Facts connected with the Stopping of the Press” is such a rare document that its re-publication is bound to arouse great interest. … A handbill was … posted outside the Printing Office announcing that “Facts connected with the stopping of the Press and the censorship of the Fiscal” would be published the following Monday morning at 8 a.m. Greig arranged his “Statement of Facts”, and his comments on the “insult offered to an innocent and meritorious editor”.  This was all set in type, ready to be thrown off and published, but Somerset was determined it should not appear, so he sent the Fiscal on Sunday afternoon with a warrant to seal up the press.  Greig showed him how this should be done, but as the type was not mentioned in the warrant, this was not sealed.  The Fiscal departed, delighted that there would be no publication of the Facts next morning.  Greig immediately added a copy of the warrant and an account of the day’s events to the Facts already in type, and then the three printers worked all night pressing wetted paper with “mallet and planer” on to the inked type!  Next morning the street in front of the office was thronged with people, and hundreds of copies of the Facts were thrown from the upper storey windows, to the deep mortification of Somerset and the Fiscal.  When it was too late, the latter appeared again to seal up the type and the composing room!’ £17.50

Schutte, C. E. G.: Dr. John Philip’s Observations regarding the Hottentots of South Africa [Archives Year Book for South African History, Third Year, Part I] (Pretoria: Ministry of the Interior, 1940) WITH, ‘ ‘n Kaapse huishoue in die 18de eeu uit Von Dessin se briefboek en memoriaal’, by J. L. M. Franken, AND ‘Transvaal en Britse susereiniteit 1881-1884’, by D. J. Pieterse.   Archives Year Book for South African History, Third Year, Part I.  276 x 178 mm; original printed wrappers; pp. (viii) + 344.  Wrappers partially sunned, corners curled, with penned date and label remnant to backstrip; archival tape reinforcing to head and tail of spine; edges foxed, occasional foxing elsewhere.  Good.  The Franken piece on Cape social history fills the first ninety or so pages, and is in Afrikaans, with quotations from Dessin’s Dutch.  Schutte’s important work covers the Khoikhoi, as perceived by Dr. Philip,  takes up around a hundred and seventy pages, and is in English.  Pieterse’s work on the British suzeraintly of the Transvaal during the early 1880s is around ninety pages in length. £30.00

CHURCH HISTORY

Smith, Edwin W.: Die lewe en tye van Daniël Lindley (1801-1880) Sendeling onder die Zoeloes. Predikant van die Boere. Ubebe Omhlope (Cape Town: Methodist Publishing House, [1947?]) Translated and abridged, in consultation with the author, by Timo Kriel.  8vo; original blue cloth, lettered in black on spine and upper cover; dustwrapper; pp. xiii + (i) + 252; contemporary illustrations.  Dustwrapper tanned and a little edgeworn, with small archival tape repairs to reverse; edges and endpapers somewhat foxed.  Good to very good condition.  Afrikaans text.  ‘Die verhaal van een van die eerste Amerikaanse sendelinge in Suid-Afrika staan in nou verband met die mees romantiese tydperk van die geskiedenis van die land.  Met twee metgeselle en hulle vrouens het Lindley met ‘n ossewa duisend myl die binneland (destyds byna onbekend) binnegedring om die evangelie te verkondig aan die Matabeles en hulle gedugte opperhoof, Silkaats – ‘n onderneming waarin hulle die samewerking geniet het van Robert Moffat in die jare voor die koms van Livingstone.  Na die rampe wat die sending vernietig het, het hulle na Natal getrek.  Sy koms in Suid-Afrika in 1835 het saamgeval met die Groot Trek van die Boere.  Lindley het die eerste predikant van die Voortrekkers geword – die enigste wat hulle in daardie tyd gehad het – en sy gemeente het die hele Natal, Oranje-Vrystaat en Transvaal van daardie dae behels. … By die vertaling in Afrikaans is die oorspronklike ietwat verkort, maar owerigens is dit ‘n getroue weergawe van die Engelse uitgawe.’ £20.00

[Vos, Michiel Christiaan]: Merkwaardig verhaal, aangaande het leven en de lotgevallen van Michiel Christiaan Vos, Predikant der Hervormde Christelijke Gemeente, op onderscheidene plaatsen in Nederland, Afrika en Azië; van zijne Jeugd af tot den tijd van zijn Emeritusschap (Holland, Mich.: E. Meijer & C. Vorst, 1861) Title continues: Door hem zelven in den Jare 1819 briefsgewijze aan eenen vriend medegedeeld.  Crown 8vo; original quarter calf, with marbled sides; pp. (viii) + 204 + (x).  Signed in pencil ‘Adriaan Janse / Grand Rapids / Mich’ to front free endpaper, and ‘Adrian Janse / Grand Rapids’ to rear free endpaper.  The final pages provide a list of subscribers, from places in New York, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and New Jersey, whose surnames indicate that they were almost exclusively members of the Dutch community in the United States.  The American printing of this work is exceedingly uncommon, and not listed in SABIB.  Boards rather rubbed, and spine ends worn; hinges starting; foxed throughout; trace of damp ingress.  “The remarkable narrative of the life and adventures of Michael Christian Vos, preacher of the Reformed Christian Community, in various localities in Dutch South Africa and Asia, from his youth to the time of his superannuation, written by him in the year 1819, and communicated to a friend in a series of letters. … Michael Christian Vos was born in Cape Town on December 31, 1759, and after receiving a preliminary education at the Cape, proceeded in the year 1790 to Holland to study divinity.  Returning to South Africa in 1794, he was appointed minister at Roodezand, but in 1802 he left this place for England, where he entered the service of the London Missionary Society.  He went to Ceylon and Madras, again returning to the Cape in 1809.  He was then called to the position of minister to the Swartberg (afterwards Caledon) community, where he remained till his superannuation in 1818, when he took up his residence at Roodesand (Tulbagh).” – Mendelssohn II, p. 576 £35.00

EASTERN CAPE

Ayliff, John, and Joseph Whiteside: History of the Abambo, generally known as Fingos (Cape Town: Struik, 1962) Willem Hiddingh Reprint Series, Number 17.  Number 97 of an edition limited to 500 copies.  Text facsimile of the edition printed at Butterworth in 1912.  12mo; original salmon-coloured cloth, lettered in gilt on spine and upper cover; tinted top edge; pp. (viii) + 107 + (i), incl. index; genealogical tables.  Cover rather sunned; a little foxing to endpapers, occasional fox spot elsewhere.  Very good condition.  “History from dispersion by Shaka to Glen Grey Act; names of clans, genealogies, &c.” – Schapera, E573.  A history of the Mfengu people, in which Whiteside draws upon material dictated by John Ayliff fifty years before. £17.50

Kirby, Donald (author), and J. B. Bullock (editor): Peddie – Settlers’ Outpost (Grahamstown: Grocott & Sherry, 1960) 8vo; light blue printed side-stitched wrappers; pp. (vi) + 73 + (i); frontis.; plates, incl. folding.  Spine a little sunned; some foxing to edges, occasional fox spot elsewhere.  Good to very good condition.  Exceedingly uncommon local history of this village in the frontier district of the Eastern Cape.  Fort Peddie, established in the first half of the nineteenth century as part of the defence of the Cape colony against hostile Xhosa tribespeople, was the focal point of a district that experienced continual upheaval during the Frontier Wars. £50.00

Lee, Margaret Jackson: The Collegiate Schools. The Centenary and Beyond 1974 – 2004 (Port Elizabeth: The Collegiate School for Girls, 2007) Squarish 8vo; pictorial papered boards; pp. vii + (i) + 272, incl. index; several illustrations.  Very good condition.  The recent history of the famous Port Elizabeth girls’ school, continuing the record from the point at which J. J. Redgrave’s ‘The Collegiate School for Girls, Port Elizabeth 1874-1974’ ends.  ‘With the original history of “The Collegiate” written by J.J. Redgrave for the centenary celebrations now out of print, it was felt that it was timeous for a further publication documenting the history of the Collegiate schools.’ £20.00

Moloja [as narrated to J. M. Orpen]: The Story of “Fetcani Horde,” by one of themselves – Moloja, of Jozani’s Village, at Masite, near Morija, Basutoland (Cape Town: Cape Quarterly Review, 1882) Excerpt from the second issue of the ‘Cape Quarterly Review’, of  January 1882.  225 x 144 mm; no wrappers; side-stitched pages; pp. [267-275].  Not in Schapera.  ‘The following story of the “Fetcani Horde” was taken down from the lips of an old man – one of the survivors of the Amanwgane (sic) clan, by J. M. Orpen, Esq., now Governor’s Agent in Basutoland.  The events to which it refers followed upon the conquests of Chaka, between 1820 and 1828.  During that native revolutionary period, no less than 300 tribes were broken up and dispersed, and among them were the Amangwane under Matewane, who originally resided in the north-west of the present Zululand.  Although defeated by Chaka and compelled to fly southward, they were strong enough to overcome other tribes in their way (some of whom they incorporated with them), and to reimburse their losses by the booty they took in passing through the country. … The “Fetcani Horde,” as described by Moloja, occupied the tract of country about the sources of the Umtata, where they attacked the Tembus; and their apprehended approach towards the frontier of the Colony caused great alarm all along the border. … Some of the petty chiefs who were under Matewane … are still alive in the Peddie district, where they hold the position of Fingo headmen.  We are given to understand that two of them, named Kaulela and Pahla, have lately given evidence before the Native Laws and Customs Commission, and that their accounts, as to the history of the Fingoes coincides in the main particulars with that given in the following statement by Moloja.’ £15.00

GEOLOGY

Brain, C. K.: Alex L. du Toit: Memorial Lectures No. 17: The Evolution of Man in Africa: Was It a Consequence of Cainozoic Cooling? (Johannesburg: The Geological Society of South Africa, 1981) Annexure to Volume LXXXIV.  297 x 210 mm; saddle-stitched printed card wrappers; pp. (ii) + 19; diagrams.  Partial discoloration to slightly creased wrappers; some foxing.  Very good condition. £12.50

Cloud, Preston: Alex L. du Toit Memorial Lectures No. 14: Major Features of Crustal Evolution(Johannesburg: The Geological Society of South Africa, 1976) Annexure to Volume LXXIX.  297 x 210 mm; saddle-stitched printed card wrappers; pp. (ii) + 33; charts.  Trace of fishmothing to edges of wrappers; a little foxing.  Very good condition. £10.00

Cooke, H. B. S.: Alex L. du Toit Memorial Lectures No. 5: Observations Relating to Quaternary Environments in East and Southern Africa (Johannesburg: The Geological Society of South Africa, [1957]) Annexure to Volume LX.  240 x 185 mm; side-stitched printed card wrappers; pp. (ii) + 73; several tables, cross-sections and maps, incl. folding.  Wrappers somewhat tanned; earlier owner’s hand-stamp to upper cover; staples a little rusted.  Very good condition. £12.50

Dixey, F.: Alex L. du Toit Memorial Lectures No. 4: Some Aspects of the Geomorphology of Central and Southern Africa (Johannesburg: The Geological Society of South Africa, [1955]) Annexure to Volume LVIII.  240 x 180 mm; side-stitched printed card wrappers; pp. (iv) + 58; several tables, cross-sections and maps, incl. folding.  Wrappers somewhat tanned; earlier owner’s hand-stamp to upper cover; staples a trifle rusted.  Very good condition. £15.00

Du Toit, Alex. L.: The Geology of South Africa (Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd, 1926, 1st edition) 8vo; original red cloth; pp. xi + (i) + 463, incl. index; line drawings, geological maps and cross-sections, photographic plates; large folding colour map at rear.  Cover irregularly sunned and discoloured, frayed at head and tail of spine; scattered foxing; occasional fingering.  Good.  “His innumerable notebooks were filled with data on the minutest details observed under all conditions of travel: on foot, bicycle or motorcycle; in motor-car, train or aeroplane.  Nothing escaped his eye or appeared too insignificant for detailed recording.  He could, moreover, synthesize his recorded details into broad, readily comprehensible pictures.  His ability to concentrate under the most diverse and adverse conditions was remarkable, much of his scientific work being jotted down in buses, in trains and while waiting in railway stations. … In spite of incessant travel and highly responsible duties, he succeeded in compiling his renowned Geology of South Africa (Edinburgh, 1926, 1939, 1954), which became a standard text-book, and is now out of print, although no adequate substitute has as yet appeared.” – DSAB I, pp. 266-7. £37.50

Flint, W., and J. D. F. Gilchrist (editors): Science in South Africa: A Handbook and Review (Cape Town: T. Maskew Miller, 1905) Alex L. du Toit’s copy; signed by him on front free endpaper.  Royal 8vo; original green cloth, titled in gilt on spine and upper cover; pp. x + 505, incl. index; folding colour frontis. map, and a further 5 maps; 2 coloured plates with captioned tissue guards; two diagrammatic plates, and several other diagrams, tables, and illustrations.  Good; cloth rather rubbed, esp. to fore-corners and joints; spine frayed at head and tail; browning throughout; binding slack; coloured plates have worked loose, but are present.  (Mendelssohn II, p. 291)  Geologist Alexander Logie du Toit (1878-1948), previous owner of this volume, is regarded, alongside Sir Basil Schonland, as one of the greatest scientists South Africa produced.  In the 1930s, du Toit further developed the continental drift theory of the German Alfred Wegener, and was the originator of the idea of two supercontinents, Laurasia and Gondwanaland.  Professor Reginald Aldworth Daly of Harvard University, after joining du Toit in fieldwork, described him as “the world’s greatest field geologist.” (DSAB I, p. 266)  Alex du Toit’s most famous works are Geology of South Africa (Edinburgh, 1926) and Our Wandering Continents (Edinburgh, 1937), in which he provided abundant evidence for the continental drift hypothesis. (DSAB I, p. 267) £50.00

Haughton, S. H.: Alex L. du Toit Memorial Lectures No. 3: Gondwanaland and the Distribution of Early Reptiles (Johannesburg: The Geological Society of South Africa, [1953]) Annexure to Volume LVI.  240 x 183 mm; saddle-stitched printed card wrappers; pp. (ii) + 30; maps; tables, incl. folding.  Wrappers somewhat tanned with trace of spotting; earlier owner’s hand-stamp to upper cover.  Very good condition. £15.00

Haughton, S. H., with L. J. and A. V. Krige: On Intraformational Folding Connected with the Glacial Bed in the Table Mountain Sandstone (Johannesburg: The Geological Society of South Africa, [1926]) Ownership inscription of K. H. Barnard, curator of the South African Museum, to upper cover.  Offprint from ‘The Transactions of the Geological Society of S. Africa’, Vol. XXVIII., 1925.  246 x 187 mm; side-stitched printed wrappers; pp. [19-25]; 3 plates, with explanatory tissue-guards.  Wrappers a little sunned, lightly soiled, with trace of foxing.  Good.  “This paper is the outcome of recent visits paid to certain mountain areas in the Western Province, for the specific purpose of investigating some peculiar intraformational folding below the Upper Shale Band of the Table Mountain Sandstone, of which no previous record appears to have been made in South African Geological literature.  The account of the Wellington Sneeuwkop has been written by one of us, that of the Somerset Sneeuwkop area by the other two.  The conclusions as to the origin of the folding embody, however, the views of all three authors.” £15.00

Judd, William R.: Alex L. du Toit Memorial Lectures No. 10: Geotechnical Communication Problems(Johannesburg: The Geological Society of South Africa, 1967) Annexure to Volume LXVIII.  240 x 183 mm; saddle-stitched printed card wrappers; pp. (ii) + 45; several photographs and diagrams.  Wrappers partially sunned, with faint trace of fishmothing; occasional spotting; earlier owner’s hand-stamp to upper cover; staples a little rusted.  Very good condition. £12.50

King, Lester C.: Alex L. du Toit Memorial Lectures No. 9: Geological Relationships Between South Africa and Antarctica (Johannesburg: The Geological Society of South Africa, 1965) Annexure to Volume LXVIII.  242 x 178 mm; side-stitched printed card wrappers; pp. (vi) + 32; colour frontis; photographs and maps, incl. folding.  Occasional spotting; earlier owner’s hand-stamp and signature to upper cover; staples a little rusted.  Very good condition. £15.00

Kuenen, Ph. H.: Alex L. du Toit Memorial Lectures No. 6: Sand – Its Origin, Transportation, Abrasion and Accumulation (Johannesburg: The Geological Society of South Africa, 1959) Annexure to Volume LXII.  240 x 175 mm; side-stitched printed card wrappers; pp. (ii) + 33; plates.  Wrappers somewhat tanned; trace of fishmothing, with earlier owner’s hand-stamp and signature to upper cover; staples a little rusted; occasional fox spot.  Good to very good condition. £10.00

Pretorius, Desmond A.: Alex L. du Toit Memorial Lectures No. 13: The Crustal Architecture of Southern Africa (Johannesburg: The Geological Society of South Africa, 1979) Annexure to Volume LXXVI.  Delivered 1973, but published 1979.  297 x 210 mm; saddle-stitched printed card wrappers; pp. (ii) + 60; several charts and maps, incl. folding.  A little spotting.  Very good condition. £15.00

Read, H. H.: Alex L. du Toit Memorial Lectures No. 2: Metamorphism and Granitisation(Johannesburg: The Geological Society of South Africa, [1951]) Annexure to Volume LIV.  243 x 185 mm; saddle-stitched printed card wrappers; pp. (ii) + 27.  Wrappers somewhat tanned; earlier owner’s hand-stamp to upper cover.  Very good condition. £10.00

Simpson, E. S. W.: Alex L. du Toit Memorial Lectures No. 15: Evolution of the South Atlantic(Johannesburg: The Geological Society of South Africa, 1977) Annexure to Volume LXXX.  297 x 210 mm; saddle-stitched printed card wrappers; pp. (ii) + 15; maps; diagrams.  A little foxing.  Very good condition. £10.00

Skinner, Brian J.: Alex L. du Toit Memorial Lectures No. 16: The Frequency of Mineral Deposits(Johannesburg: The Geological Society of South Africa, 1979) Annexure to Volume LXXXII.  297 x 210 mm; saddle-stitched printed card wrappers; pp. (ii) + 12; tables; graphs.  Earlier owner’s initials penned on upper cover; small scuff to first leaf of lecture; a little foxing.  Very good condition. £8.50

Wegmann, C. E.: Alex L. du Toit Memorial Lectures No. 8: Tectonic Patterns at Different Levels (Johannesburg: The Geological Society of South Africa, 1963) Annexure to Volume LXVI.  240 x 178 mm; side-stitched printed card wrappers; pp. (ii) + 78; photographs and diagrams.  Wrappers somewhat tanned; earlier owner’s hand-stamp to upper cover; staples a little rusted; some foxing.  Very good condition. £15.00

HUNTING AND FISHING

Anderson, Andrew A.: Twenty-Five Years in a Waggon (Cape Town: Struik, 1974) Number 896 of an edition limited to 1000 copies.  This is the forty-eighth volume in the Africana Collectanea series.  Text facsimile of the Chapman and Hall edition of 1888.  8vo; original red rexine with gilt lettering to spine, and gilt publisher’s device to upper board; pictorial dustwrapper; pp. (iv) + xii + (ii) + 427, incl. index; folding map; plates.  Dustwrapper very slightly sunned on spine panel; merest trace of foxing to rear endpaper.  Near fine condition.  “The author traveled through Griqualand, Namaqualand, Damaraland, and Ovampoland, commenting on the state of the countryside and native populations, particularly during his journeys in the mid-1860s.  There are numerous sporting encounters with lion, leopard, giraffe and buffalo as well as the usual hunts for plains antelope for the pot.  Anderson almost died of thirst while crossing the Kalahari Desert.” – Kenneth Czech, An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785-1999 £25.00

Baldwin, William Charles: African Hunting (Bulawayo: Books of Zimbabwe, 1981) Full title:  ‘African Hunting and Adventure from Natal to the Zambesi, including Lake Ngami, the Kalahari Desert, &c. From 1852 to 1860.’  This is the fourth volume in the ‘African Hunting Reprint Series.’  Text facsimile reprint of the Richard Bentley second edition of 1863, with a new introduction by Gary W. Clendennen.  8vo; original brown boards with gilt lettering to spine, and gilt elephant device to upper board; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. xii + x + 451, incl. index; folding map; plates; line drawings in text.  Slight bump to top fore-corner of upper board; faint foxing to endpapers.  Near fine condition.  “A work of early sport and travel, this describes Baldwin’s journeys through Natal, Zululand, the Transvaal, Bechuanaland, Matabeleland, and Namaqualand to the Zambesi and Victoria Falls (though not yet known as that).  He hunted in the lands of the Amatongas and Zulus where he collected hippopotamus, lion, eland, rhinoceros, buffalo, kudu and giraffe.  Near Lake Ngami, he bagged elephant, then crossed the Tugela River on his way to the Zambesi (Victoria) Falls where he encountered buffalo and lion.” – Kenneth P. Czech: An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785 to 1950.  “Mr. Baldwin’s experiences are written in a simple and unostentatious manner, but he went through more adventures than almost any other of the great South African travellers and hunters.  He was fond of company at night round the camp fire but preferred shooting alone, and appears at times to have hunted in the same costume as Gordon Cumming, remarking, ‘When on foot, a blue and white shirt and a stout pair of gaiters, with the addition of a cap and shoes, are about all I burden my body with.'” – Mendelssohn. £25.00

Baldwin, William Charles: African Hunting and Adventure (Cape Town: Struik, 1967) Number 202 of an edition limited to 750 copies.  Full title:  ‘African Hunting and Adventure from Natal to the Zambesi, including Lake Ngami, the Kalahari Desert, &c. From 1852 to 1860.’  This is the twenty-sixth volume in the Africana Collectanea series.  Text facsimile of the Richard Bentley third edition of 1894.  8vo; original brown rexine with gilt lettering to spine, and gilt publisher’s device to upper board; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. (ii) + x + 428, incl. index; folding map; plates, some of which in colours; line drawings in text.  Small closed tear to top edge of dustwrapper’s lower panel; slight bump to bottom fore-corners.  Very good condition.  “A work of early sport and travel, this describes Baldwin’s journeys through Natal, Zululand, the Transvaal, Bechuanaland, Matabeleland, and Namaqualand to the Zambesi and Victoria Falls (though not yet known as that).  He hunted in the lands of the Amatongas and Zulus where he collected hippopotamus, lion, eland, rhinoceros, buffalo, kudu and giraffe.  Near Lake Ngami, he bagged elephant, then crossed the Tugela River on his way to the Zambesi (Victoria) Falls where he encountered buffalo and lion.” – Kenneth P. Czech: An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785 to 1950 £50.00

Bell, W. D. M.: Karamojo Safari (London: Victor Gollancz, 1949) First British edition, contemporaneous with the American first edition.  8vo; later brown half leather, with lighter brown leatherette sides, and gilt-on-red spine labels; new endpapers (thus no endpaper maps); pp. 288.  Scattered, moderate foxing.  Very good condition.  (Czech, p. 24)  “Bell first arrived in Africa in 1897 and was renowned as an elephant hunter, particularly in the Karamojo region northeast of Lake Victoria.  This book describes his fourth safari into the region.  Crossing the River Turkwel, he pursued elephants near the Dabasien Mts., through Karamojo, then continued into the bush and swamp country west of Lake Rudolf.  One of the best of the more modern big game hunting titles.” – Kenneth Czech, An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785-1999 £70.00

Blunt, David Enderby: Elephant (London: Neville Spearman, [1971]) Text facsimile of the 1933 first edition.  With a foreword by the Rt. Hon. the Earl of Lonsdale.  8vo; original red boards, lettered in gilt on spine; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. viii + (iv) + 260, incl. index; plates.  Slightest crease to bottom edge of dustwrapper’s lower panel; earlier owner’s discreet hand-stamp to endpapers.  Near fine condition.  ‘Blunt was an elephant control officer in Tanganyika, hunting primarily in the Linda Province.  He details the natural history and biology of the elephant, relates his experiences as a cultivation officer and provides an excellent chapter on past and present elephant hunters.  “I am sure that an elephant looks on human beings in the same way as we look on a dangerous insect.”  A classic of African elephant hunting.’ – Kenneth Czech, An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785-1999 £85.00

Bulpin, T. V.: The Ivory Trail (Cape Town: Howard B. Timmins, 1954) First edition of this South African classic.  Illustrations by C. T. Astley Maberly.  8vo; original cloth-backed cream boards; price-clipped pictorial dustwrapper; endpaper map; pp. 205; frontis. portrait; line drawings in text.  Dustwrapper (housed in removable protector) a bit edgeworn, with discreet archival tape repairs to reverse; boards slightly foxed and bottom edges a little rubbed; some foxing to edges, occasional fox spot elsewhere.  Very good condition.  “The uproarious story of Bvekenya, the greatest of all poachers, and his wild companions who followed the ivory trail, does for Rhodesia, Moçambique and the northern areas of the N.E. Transvaal, what Jock of the Bushveld has done for the men of the old Lourenço Marques road.  Bvekenya (S. C. Barnard to give him his real name) is almost a legend in the wilderness and on the great Limpopo river.  Here he relives the strange adventures of ivory poaching, blackbirding and outlawry, which made him one of the most colourful of all personalities in Africa.  We read of the hunts, fights, escapades and adventures of a man who was an outlaw for twenty years, and adventurer of the wilds who defied the police of three countries and fought a one-man war with complete success against all control and authority.  The story of the king of the ivory poachers, as told by himself to T. V. Bulpin.” £50.00

Cattrick, Alan: Spoor of Blood (London: Bailey Bros. & Swinfen, 1959) 8vo; original green boards, with red lettering to spine and upper cover; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. 223; plates.  Dustwrapper a little rubbed, sunned and edgeworn; corners of boards slightly turned; regular browning, as usual; earlier owner’s name on front free endpaper.  Good to very good condition.  “This is the story of the immense herds of wild animals that roamed the plains of South Africa before civilisation reached our shores, and of what happened when the guns began their deadly work.  Into his narrative the author has woven character sketches of some of the most famous early naturalists and hunters.  Here are Burchell, Harris, Gordon Cumming, Petrus Jacobs, Selous and Pretorius with stories of their fantastic adventures in the wilds of Africa.  Selous crawling out from beneath a live, bull elephant … Harris shooting the first Sable Antelope … Jacobs mauled by a lion at the age of 70.  But the author’s hero is James Stevenson-Hamilton, the man who resigned from a crack cavalry regiment to live at Sabie for over 40 years and build the Kruger National Park.” £15.00

Cumming, R. Gordon: A Hunter’s Life in South Africa (Bulawayo: Books of Zimbabwe, 1980) These are the first two volumes in the ‘African Hunting Reprint Series.’  Text facsimile reprint of the two-volume John Murray 2nd edition of 1850, with a new introduction by Professor James A. Casada.  Two 8vo volumes; original brown boards with gilt lettering to spine, and gilt elephant device to upper board in each case; pictorial dustwrappers, housed in removable protectors; pp. xvii + xv + (i) + 388, (iv) + 381; plates, + route map in first volume.  Spine panel of first volume’s dustrapper slightly sunned.  Near fine condition.  ‘A particularly fine example of Victorian sporting literature, the book was markedly successful and ran to many editions.  Gordon-Cumming writes of his hunting expedition which started from Grahamstown in October 1843 and which took him through countryside teeming with game – “not with herds, but with ‘one vast herd’ of springboks; as far as the eye could strain…” – to the Orange River and Griqualand West where he met Oswell, and, at Kuruman, Robert Moffat and, soon after, David Livingstone.  He appears to have hunted every species of South African fauna and to have indulged himself in the sport to an extent almost unique even amongst the mighty hunters of Africa.  The narrative is valuable for its description of the country and its inhabitants, and for its zoological and botanical notes.’ £40.00

Das Neves, D[iocleciano] Fernandes: A Hunting Expedition to the Transvaal (Pretoria: The State Library, 1987 A text facsimile of the original George Bell edition of 1879, which was translated from the Portuguese by Mariana Monteiro.  With a new preface by J. B. de Waal, and an index by P. M. Malherbe.  Number 95 in The State Library Reprints series.  8vo; original pictorial boards; endpaper map; pp. viii + (viii) + xi + (i) + 298, incl. index; folding map; contemporary photographs and line drawings.  Spine very slightly sunned.  Near fine condition.  “A Portuguese hunter and explorer, Das Neves set out from Lourenço Marques on an expedition into the Transvaal in 1860 to collect ivory and stimulate trade in Portuguese territory.  He hunted hippopotamus on the river Save, also collecting buffalo and gazelle there.  Near Zoutpansberg in the northern Transvaal, he hunted lion, buffalo and elephant … ” – Kenneth Czech, An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785-1999.  “Das Neves must have been a very intelligent young man and an excellent organizer, because his expedition proved to be a great success materially and scientifically.  Nothing which was worth mentioning, escaped his alert mind and observing eyes.  He described some of the beliefs of Black people on hunting; he reported on certain chiefs whom het met; he was one of the first white men to visit the lands of Queen Modjadji of the Lobedu and most probably the first to describe her rain-making; he had a long intimate talk with Muzila, the ultimate successor of chief Manukuza (Soshangave) and also tells us how he was nearly killed by Muzila’s younger brother and rival for the crown, the hostile Mawewe; he also gave a description of the dresses worn by Black women as well as the type of beads they favoured.  His geographical descriptions of certain places in the present Kruger National Park are so vivid that they have been easily located thereby.” – From the Preface. £65.00

Duffy, Kevin: Black Elephant Hunter (London: Peter Davies, 1960) First edition.  8vo; original green boards, lettered in silver gilt to spine; no dustwrapper; pp. (viii) + 208; map; plates.  Spine a little sunned; small penned notation to front pastedown; trace of foxing.  Very good condition.  (Czech, p. 87)  “Duffy met and filmed Yose, a native hunter armed with an old muzzleloader, who hunted elephant, buffalo, waterbuck and other game, primarily in the Luangwa Valley in old Norther Rhodesia.” – Kenneth Czech, An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785-1999 £10.00

Finaughty, William: The Recollections of William Finaughty, Elephant Hunter 1864-1875 (Bulawayo: Books of Zimbabwe, 1980) This is the third volume in the ‘African Hunting Reprint Series.’  Text facsimile reprint of the J. B. Lippincott first edition of 1916, with a new foreword and notes by Edward C. Tabler, and additional sketch map and illustrations.  8vo; original brown boards with gilt lettering to spine, and gilt elephant device to upper board; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. (xxviii) + 244, incl. index; plates; map.  Spine panel a little sunned.  Near fine condition.  Concerning the original, Ken Czech writes:  ‘One of the rarest of all African big game hunting titles, this was privately printed by George L. Harrison in an edition of 250 copies for distribution to noteworthy African sportsmen and other luminaries including Theodore Roosevelt and Sir Alfred Pease.  Harrison, who was on safari in Rhodesia in 1908, not only hunted with Finaughty’s son, but later met the author and was given a set of The Rhodesian Journal, a weekly newspaper which had serialized the elder Finaughty’s original recollections.  From these, Harrison published the work less one chapter from an issue missing from his set.  When William Finaughty entered Matabeleland and Mashonaland in the 1860s, the “elephants practically did not know what a gunshot was.”  Though the recollections bounce around a bit, this volume presents numerous exciting encounters with elephant, buffalo, lion and other big game.’ – Kenneth Czech, An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785-1999 £25.00

Finaughty, William: The Recollections of William Finaughty, Elephant Hunter 1864-1875 (Bulawayo: Books of Rhodesia, 1973) This is the twenty-ninth volume in the Rhodesiana Reprint Library Gold Series.  Text facsimile reprint of the J. B. Lippincott first edition of 1916, with a new foreword and notes by Edward C. Tabler, and additional sketch map and illustrations.  8vo; original brown boards with gilt lettering to spine and upper cover; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. (xxviii) + 244, incl. index; plates; map.  Spine panel very slightly sunned; faint trace of foxing to endpapers.  Near fine condition.  Concerning the original, Ken Czech writes:  ‘One of the rarest of all African big game hunting titles, this was privately printed by George L. Harrison in an edition of 250 copies for distribution to noteworthy African sportsmen and other luminaries including Theodore Roosevelt and Sir Alfred Pease.  Harrison, who was on safari in Rhodesia in 1908, not only hunted with Finaughty’s son, but later met the author and was given a set of The Rhodesian Journal, a weekly newspaper which had serialized the elder Finaughty’s original recollections.  From these, Harrison published the work less one chapter from an issue missing from his set.  When William Finaughty entered Matabeleland and Mashonaland in the 1860s, the “elephants practically did not know what a gunshot was.”  Though the recollections bounce around a bit, this volume presents numerous exciting encounters with elephant, buffalo, lion and other big game.’ – Kenneth Czech, An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785-1999 £25.00

Finaughty, William: The Recollections of William Finaughty, Elephant Hunter 1864-1875 (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1991) A volume in the ‘Peter Capstick Adventure Library’, the series editor of which is Peter Hathaway Capstick.  8vo; original green boards, lettered in gilt on spine; laminated pictorial dustwrapper; pp. (x) + 242.  Text facsimile of the Harrison printing of 1916, which was limited to 250 copies.  A little light spotting to endpapers, edges and outermost leaves.  Very good condition.  ‘Taken from the years well before and during the Anglo-Boer War, one of the great, early ivory hunters told his adventures to a friend who owned the pioneer paper The Rhodesian Journal.  Adventurer, rogue, and hunter extraordinaire, William Finaughty survived the death that awaited many early elephant hunters, bagging over five hundred tuskers in five years, as well as living through the intrigues with which the early South Africa was fraught.  “Bill” Finaughty even shot five elephants with four bullets, a feat that is typical of this book.  That he hunted entirely with a muzzle-loading rifle adds a great deal of zest to this classic tale of which only 250 copies were printed, and less than half survive today.’ £17.50

Harris, William Cornwallis: The Wild Sports of Southern Africa (Cape Town: Struik, 1987) Facsimile of the text and plates of the fifth edition published by Henry G. Bohn in 1852.  8vo; original green boards lettered in gilt on spine; laminated pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. (vi) + xvi + 359.  Trace of foxing to endpapers.  Near fine condition.  ‘Captain (later Sir) William Cornwallis Harris was an Englishman with a passion for the hunting of big game.  “From my boyhood upwards,” he says, “I have been taxed by the facetious with ‘shooting madness’, and truly a most delightful mania I have ever found it.”  An officer in the East India Company’s corps of engineers, he was granted two years’ leave on medical grounds, and decided to exploit this opportunity to indulge his interest in the wild game of Africa.  He arrived at the Cape in 1836 and spent two years travelling in South Africa, from Port Elizabeth to as far north as the Limpopo River – described in his book as “a hunting expedition from the Cape of Good Hope through the territories of the Chief Moselekatse to the Tropic of Capricorn”.  But Harris was not just a hunter: he was a careful observer of the social and political situation in which he found himself – a situation of special interest because his visit coincided with the early days of the Great Trek, and he made detailed observations about the conditions of the Trekkers, and of their initial conflicts with indigenous people.’ £30.00

Hodson, Arnold W.: Trekking the Great Thirst. Travel and Sport in the Kalahari Desert(Johannesburg: Africana Book Society, 1977) Volume 12 in the Africana Reprint Library.  Text facsimile of the 1912 Unwin first edition, with a new introduction by Professor R. S. Roberts.  8vo; orange-brown rexine, with silver gilt lettering to spine; upper cover with silver gilt lettering, hunter and oryx device; tinted top edge; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pictorial endpapers; pp. xvi + 359, incl. index; colour frontis. with tissue-guard; plates; four folding maps, including large folding map at end.  Small trace of fishmothing to bottom edge of final index leaf.  Near fine condition.  “Trekking the Great Thirst was first published in book form in 1912 (the edition now being reprinted) much of it having originated as contemporary articles written for sporting and other popular magazines.  It deals mainly with the journeys and hunting expeditions of the author in the Bechuanaland Protectorate (now Botswana) in the years 1904-1910.  His duties as policeman and magistrate took him into the most remote parts of the territory, one of his missions being to the Damaraland frontier at the time of the Herero and Nama Wars in German South-West Africa.  He was also much involved in trying to reconcile conflicts between tribal chiefs.  His several political missions, on which his narrative turns, cover a most important period in the history of Botswana, and his account gives an informative picture of the character of the people, their mode of living, and the harshness of the waterless regions with their great trackless distances.” £30.00

Lucas, T. J.: Camp Life and Sport in South Africa (Johannesburg: Africana Book Society, 1975) Volume 2 in the Africana Reprint Library.  Text facsimile of the 1878 Chapman and Hall first edition, with a new foreword by H. C. Hummel of the Department of History at Rhodes University, and a new index.  8vo; brown rexine, with silver gilt lettering to spine; upper cover with black rules; tinted top edge; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pictorial endpapers; pp. 258 + (ii), incl. index; colour frontis. with tissue-guard; four two-tone plates.  Near fine condition.  “Lucas was a member of the Cape Mounted Rifles during one of the series of … Wars that erupted in South Africa.  While most of the text relates military adventures, the author found time to hunt wildebeest and lion in the kopje country near Bloemfontein.” – Czech.  “In his second work, ‘Camp life and sport in South Africa’ (London, 1878), he describes his experiences in the C.M.R. as well as hunting trips and the hardships suffered by game during periods of continuous drought.” – DSAB III, p. 545.  ‘An account of some years’ service with the Cape Mounted Rifles, in the course of which Captain Lucas went through a campaign in Kaffraria [the Eighth Frontier War] and afterwards visited Bloemfontein.  He accompanied Sir George Clarke on his mission to restore self-government to the “Orange River Sovereignty,” but was of opinion that the retrocession of the country was unpopular amongst many of the settlers and inhabitants.  The volume contains many notes on sport and hunting, and several coloured engravings.” – Mendelssohn. £20.00

Millais, John Guille: A Breath from the Veldt (Bulawayo: Books of Rhodesia, 1974) Number 418 of an edition limited to 750 numbered copies.  Facsimile reproduction of the first edition published by Henry Sotheran and Co., London, 1895, with additional frontispiece and Publishers’ Introduction.  Folio (395 x 310 mm); white pictorial cloth, blocked in black on spine and upper cover; housed in original pictorial box; top edge gilt; pp. (x) + x + 236; thirteen ‘electro etchings’ on card, with tissue-guards; twelve further full-plates; one hundred and twenty-five text illustrations by the author.  Box somewhat scuffed, with archival tape repair to one corner of lid; cloth clean and bright; earlier owner’s name signed on front free endpaper; ripple to section of front pastedown’s top edge; a little light foxing.  Very good condition.  A beautiful production.  “Highlighted by the author’s detailed illustrations, this work represents Millais’ journey toward the Limpopo River with excursions to hunt kudu, reedbuck, waterbuck, sable and roan.  Near the Nuanetsi River, he bagged buffalo and zebra.  After leaving the Limpopo, he collected trophy kudu, as well as lion and leopard.  A most readable and visually exciting book of African travel and big-game hunting.” – Kenneth Czech, An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785-1999 £185.00

Mohr, Eduard: To the Victoria Falls of the Zambesi (Bulawayo: Books of Rhodesia, 1973) This is the twenty-eighth volume in the Rhodesiana Reprint Library Gold Series.  Text facsimile of the 1876 1st edition by Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, and Rivington, with a new introduction.  8vo; original dark green cloth with gilt lettering to spine, and gilt and black pictorial blocking to upper board; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. (x) + xiv + (ii) + 462, incl. index; frontis. portrait, with tissue-guard; plates, incl. coloured; folding map.  Trace of stippling to edges of boards.  Very good condition.  ‘A German sportsman, Mohr traveled to the Victoria Falls “partly for the sake of hunting, partly in the hope of making geographical discoveries.”  After landing at Cape Town, he and his companions ventured into the interior, crossing the Tugela River and enjoying a wide variety of sport.  Eland, buffalo, black rhinoceros and kudu were bagged.  Near the Matopo Mountains, they hunted eland and wildebeest with Dreyse needle-guns, an early form of breech loader that would achieve great fame in the Franco-Prussian War which was being waged during Mohr’s expedition.  Marching from Tati to the Zambesi, lion and elephant were collected, with additional rhino and buffalo taken near the falls.  An excellent work of exploration and sport.’ – Kenneth Czech, An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785-1999 £20.00

Natal Coast Anglers’ Union (publishers): The South African Angler. Vol. 2. June 1947 to May 1948(Durban: Natal Coast Anglers’ Union, 1948) 4to; original blue cloth, lettered in gilt on spine and upper cover; twelve issues, each of 32 to 40 pages, including magazine covers; photographs; advertisements.  Cloth a bit rubbed; slightly marked to upper cover, with bump to top fore-corner; lower hinge starting.  Good to very good condition.  The journals cover both saltwater and freshwater angling.  While there is a slight emphasis on Natal, other areas of southern Africa are not neglected.  Excellent covers often show large gamefish trophies, including sharks, with the successful anglers alongside.  “In response to numerous requests it has been decided to have the twelve issues of Volume 2 of the South African Angler bound together in book form – just as the first Volume was bound.  Inside a hard cover, the last twelve issues from June 1947, up to and including this issue (May 1948) may thus be retained for handy reference.” £60.00

Neumann, Arthur H.: Elephant Hunting in East Equatorial Africa (Bulawayo: Books of Zimbabwe, 1982) This is the sixth volume in the ‘African Hunting Reprint Series.’  Text facsimile reprint of the Rowland Ward first edition of 1898, with a new introduction by Professor James A. Casada, and a new frontispiece.  8vo; original brown boards with gilt lettering to spine, and gilt elephant device to upper board; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. (x) + xix + (i) + 455, incl. index; full-page illustrations, incl. a coloured plate of butterflies; illustrations in text; folding map.  Extremities of dustwrapper’s spine panel very slightly rubbed.  Near fine condition.  “Neumann hunted throughout British East Africa, hunting rhino and oryx near the Mackenzie River, then traveling to the Jambeni Range for elephant, impala and rhinoceros.  Near Mt. Kenia, he bagged numerous elephants, and also collected rhino and lion.  In Ndorobo territory, he stalked more elephants, particularly near the Seya River.  On a second expedition, this time toward the Tana River, he again bagged elephants, then returned to Ndorobo lands for more tuskers.  On a trek toward Lake Rudolph, Neumann collected topi, lion, rhino, hippopotamus, giraffe and a variety of plains game.  A classic work of African big game hunting literature.” – Kenneth Czech, An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785-1999 £30.00

Sandeman, E. F.: Eight Months in an Ox-Waggon (Johannesburg: Africana Book Society, 1975) Africana Reprint Library, Volume One.  Text facsimile of the Griffith and Farran 1880 edition, with a new foreword by B. J. T. Leverton.  8vo; green rexine lettered in gilt on spine, with black and gilt pictorial blocking to upper cover; tinted top edge; pictorial endpapers; pictorial dustwrapper (housed in removable protector); pp. xix + (i) + xii + 402 + (ii) + 23; colour frontis., with tissue-guard; plates; large, folding map.  Spine panel of dustwrapper a little sunned.  Near fine condition.  “The author traveled into South Africa’s interior from Pietermaritzburg in 1878, and describes his hunts after springbok and blesbok after crossing the Vaal River.  Near Delagoa Bay, he collected klipspringer, reedbuck, wildebeest and lion.  Following a tributary of the Sabie River, Sandeman and his party bagged buffalo, lion and giraffe.  An interesting and well written work that ably describes the terrain, climate and encounters with native tribes and wild beasts.”  – Kenneth Czech, An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785-1999 £12.50

Scully, W. C.: Lodges in the Wilderness (London: Herbert Jenkins, 1915) Crown 8vo; purple-brown cloth with evocative desert scene on upper cover; pp. 252; plates.  Earlier owner’s name signed on fly-leaf, with date ‘9th June 1915’; backstrip a bit sunned, with repair at head; hinges just starting; sporadic, moderate foxing.  Good condition.  (Hosken, p. 180; SABIB 4, p. 181; Czech [2011], p. 250)  “Promoted to colonial magistrate in South Africa’s Cape Colony, Scully traveled into the desert areas of Bushmanland south of the Orange River in quest of oryx and springbok.  While numerous head of both species were bagged, this is more valuable for its descriptions of the forbidding terrain.” – Czech: An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books 1785-1999 £70.00

Selous, Frederick Courteney: A Hunter’s Wanderings in Africa (Bulawayo: Books of Rhodesia, 1970) This is the fourteenth volume in the Rhodesiana Reprint Library Gold Series.  Facsimile reprint of the 1881 Richard Bentley 1st edition.  8vo; original dark green cloth gilt; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. (viii) + xvii + (i) + 455, incl. index; plates; line drawings in text; folding map.  Dustwrapper very slightly sunned; earlier owner’s discreet hand-stamp to endpapers; slight bump to bottom fore-corners.  Very good to near fine condition.  Czech:  “One of the most often reprinted African big game titles, the first three editions, published in 1881, 1890, and 1893 are the most sought.  Selous traveled through Bechuanaland and Matabeleland with numerous hunting episodes after lion, black rhinoceros, buffalo, and elephant particularly in the Linquasi Valley.  In the second half of the book, he trekked across the Zambezi with a long hunt for elephant in Mashonaland.  Throughout the text, there is a wide variety of game also bagged, including sable, hippopotamus, eland, and other antelope species.” £35.00

Selous, Frederick Courteney: African Nature Notes and Reminiscences (Salisbury: The Pioneer Head, 1969) Number 833 of an edition limited to 2112 copies.  The text is a facsimile of the 1908 Macmillan 1st edition.  8vo; original salmon-coloured cloth; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; top edge gilt; endpaper facsimile; pp. (vi) + xxx + 356, incl. index; colour frontis. portrait; plates.  Earlier owner’s small hand-stamp to  endpapers.  Near fine condition.  Kenneth Czech describes this work as follows:  ‘A wide-ranging work that discusses everything from the coloration of African big game to the extinction of some species in South Africa.  There are plenty of big-game hunting episodes, which Selous uses to accent his chapters on Cape buffalo, black rhinoceros, and lion, among others.  Written at a time when there was a noticeable depletion of the great game herds, he becomes almost lyrical in his longing for the old days: “but no man will ever again sit by a camp fire near one of the little rivers … eating prime pieces of fat elephant’s heart, roasted on a forked stick, nor watch the great white rhinoceros coming to drink just before dark, nor lie and listen to herd after herd of elephants drinking and bathing in the river near the camp.”‘ – An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785 to 1950, p. 146. £40.00

Selous, Frederick Courteney: A Hunter’s Wanderings in Africa (Bulawayo: Books of Zimbabwe, 1981) This is the fifth volume in the ‘African Hunting Reprint Series.’  Text facsimile of the Richard Bentley edition of 1881, with an introduction by Professor James A. Casada, and a new frontispiece.  8vo; original brown boards with gilt lettering to spine, and gilt elephant device to upper board; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. (xvi) + xvii + (i) + 455, incl. index; plates; line drawings in text; folding map.  Dustwrapper spine panel a little sunned; suggestion of foxing to endpapers.  Near fine condition.  Czech:  “One of the most often reprinted African big game titles, the first three editions, published in 1881, 1890, and 1893 are the most sought.  Selous traveled through Bechuanaland and Matabeleland with numerous hunting episodes after lion, black rhinoceros, buffalo, and elephant particularly in the Linquasi Valley.  In the second half of the book, he trekked across the Zambezi with a long hunt for elephant in Mashonaland.  Throughout the text, there is a wide variety of game also bagged, including sable, hippopotamus, eland, and other antelope species.” £30.00

Selous, Frederick Courteney: Travel and Adventure in South-East Africa (Bulawayo: Books of Rhodesia, 1972) This is the twenty-fifth volume in the Rhodesiana Reprint Library Gold Series.  Text facsimile of the 1893 Rowland Ward 1st edition, with a new introduction and foreword.  8vo; original pale brown boards, with black lettering and gilt warrior to spine, and gilt lions to upper board; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. (xii) + xviii + 503 + (v); plates; illustrations in text; folding colour map.  Slight creasing to fore-edge of a few prelims.  Near fine condition.  ‘After a short visit to England in 1881, Selous returned to South Africa in order to make collections of specimens of some South African fauna for the British Museum and the South African Museum, &c.  He was thus engaged from 1882 to 1887, and the first nine chapters of this volume are devoted to a narrative of his experiences with the Boers and the natives while engaged in his hunting expeditions, together with some account of the native wars and the raids of the Matabeles.  Other chapters give particulars of journeys amongst the Mashikolumbwe and Barotsi people, the pioneer expeditions of the British South Africa Company, and the condition of Mashonaland, with notes on its previous history, the gold-mining industry in Rhodesia at this period, and reminiscences of hunting and adventure extending over a lengthy period.  There are many interesting passages referring to the author’s intercourse with Mr. Frank Mandy, C. J. Rhodes, Dr. Jameson, Sam Edwards, Montague Kerr, Lobengula, Khama, and many other celebrated South African personages and pioneers, and an excellent account of the Chartered Company’s expedition to Mashonaland, in which Mr. Selous took prominent part, together with some details respecting the disputes with the Portuguese officials.’ – Mendelssohn £30.00

Stigand, C. H.: Hunting the Elephant in Africa (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1986) Text facsimile of the Macmillan edition of 1913, excluding the chart which appeared in the original.  Foreword by Theodore Roosevelt.  Editor’s note for reprint edition by Peter Hathaway Capstick.  8vo; original blue boards, lettered in gilt on spine; price-clipped dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. (x) + xv + (iii) + 379, incl. index; plates.  Near fine condition.  ‘A preeminent elephant hunting title, this details Stigand’s big game hunting efforts primarily in British East Africa, North Eastern Rhodesia, Nyasaland and the Lado Enclave.  He includes chapters on hunting rhinoceros, buffalo and lion, but relates his encounters with elephants with particular verve.  As he states in Chapter 1:  “There is something so fascinating and absorbing about elephant hunting that those who have done much of it can seldom take any interest again in any other form of sport.” ‘ – Kenneth Czech, An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785-1999 £25.00

Taylor, John: Pondoro – Last of the Ivory Hunters (London: Frederick Muller, 1956) First British edition, published one year after the American first edition.  8vo; later brown half leather, with lighter brown leatherette sides, and gilt-on-red spine labels; new endpapers; pp. 275; plates.  Gift inscription to fly-leaf; small ’64’ in pen to half-title verso; very occasional fox spot.  Very good condition.  (Czech, p. 280)  ‘With this work Taylor stepped away from the more technical aspects of big game rifles to describing his numerous adventures in Africa.  He collected elephant, eland, leopard, lion, buffalo, hippo and a wide variety of other game in Nyasaland and other locales.  “Pondoro” means “lion” in Chinyungwe.’ – Kenneth Czech, An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785-1999 £35.00

Wykes, Alan: Nimrod Smith. A Profile of T. Murray Smith, M.C., Professional Big Game Hunter(London: Hamish Hamilton, 1961) First edition.  8vo; original green boards, lettered in gilt on spine; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. xi + (i) + 207.  Dustwrapper a little rubbed and slightly edgeworn, with trace of damp ingress to top edge of upper panel.  Very good condition.  (Czech, p. 307)  “Wykes’ biography of famous East African professional hunter T. Murray Smith, written with Smith’s help, and spiced with plenty of episodes of hunting elephant, buffalo, rhino, lion, etc.” – Kenneth Czech, An Annotated Bibliography of African Big Game Hunting Books, 1785-1999 £20.00

MILITARY HISTORY

Haldane, Aylmer: How We Escaped from Pretoria (Johannesburg: Africana Book Society, 1977) Africana Reprint Library, Volume Eleven.  Text facsimile of the William Blackwood 1901 edition, with a new foreword and index.  8vo; pictorial red rexine blocked in black and gilt; tinted top edge; pictorial endpapers; pictorial dustwrapper (housed in removable protector); pp. xiv + viii + (ii) + 231 + (i) + iv, incl. index; plates; folding map.  Near fine condition.  “The prisoners were taken to the Staats Model School at Pretoria, and Churchill, Brockie, and Haldane made many plans to escape, which were doomed to failure, but eventually Churchill got away on December 12th; the others were observed by a sentry, and dared not make the attempt, but later on they managed to hide themselves under the floorings of the prison, and being joined by Le Mesurier, they disappeared on February 26, 1900, to the consternation and mystification of their guards, who never supposed they were hiding in the building.  They were supplied with necessities from time to time by their fellow officers who were in the secret, but found no means to escape till March 16th, when all the prisoners were removed and the building deserted, when finding the coast clear, they succeeded in getting outside, eluded the few passers by, and were soon on the veld.  The officers were hidden by some friends amongst bales of wool, which were put on a truck attached to a passenger train bound for Delagoa Bay, which took them safely across the border.” – Mendelssohn I, pp. 669,670. £20.00

Kestell, J. D.: Through Shot and Flame (Johannesburg: Africana Book Society, 1976) Africana Reprint Library, Volume Eight.  Text facsimile of the Methuen edition of 1903, with a new foreword by O. N. Ransford, and introduction to the author by P. J. Nienaber, illustrations and an index.  8vo; red rexine, lettered in gilt on spine and upper board; pictorial endpapers; pictorial dustwrapper (housed in removable protector); pp. xix + (i) + (vi) + 347 + (i) + x, incl. index; colour frontis, with tissue-guard; plates.  Near fine condition.  ‘Through Shot and Flame is an exciting story of the South African War of 1899-1902.  Written by a great Afrikaner patriot who took part in the Tweede Vryheidsoorlog – the “Second War of Freedom” – as one of the famed Orange Free State triumvirate, it is also an important historical work.  J. D. Kestell was present at many of the significant engagements of the war and he describes them in stirring style.  Especially memorable are his accounts of Colenso, of the Boer attempt to break into Ladysmith by storming the Platrand, of his own adventures on commando and of the “Great De Wet Hunts”.  His bitter commentary on the burning of Boer farmhouses and of the concentration camps – which were established, ironically, for humanitarian reasons – provide a moving supplement to the narrative of the fighting.’ £20.00

Norris-Newman, C. L.: With the Boers in the Transvaal and Orange Free State in 1880-1(Johannesburg: Africana Book Society, 1976) Africana Reprint Library, Volume Six.  Text facsimile of the W H Allen 1882 edition, with a new foreword by O. N. Ransford.  8vo; red rexine lettered in gilt on spine, with gilt spears device to upper cover; tinted top edge; pictorial endpapers; pictorial dustwrapper (housed in removable protector); pp. xvii + (i) + xvi + 387 + (i) + viii; colour frontis., with tissue-guard; plates; folding maps.  Dustwrapper spine panel a little sunned; some fishmothing to extreme edges of three leaves.  Very good condition.  ‘An account of the Boer War of 1880-1, together with some preliminary chapters referring to the history of the South African Colonies and Republics up to this period.  The author expresses the hope that the publication of the volume will conduce “to the development of a more liberal feeling towards our future colonists, the Boers – the early pioneers of civlisation, colonisation, and European domination in South Africa.”  He considered that the causes of the war were due partially “to the peculiarities and untractableness of the Boers themselves; but, principally, to the undoubted mismanagement and willful blindness of the Imperial authorities both at home and out here, as evidenced by the various and contradictory policies pursued by successive governors.’ – Mendelssohn. £20.00

Tobin, R. F.: A Memoir of the Late Lieut.-Colonel Charles Dalton R.A.M.C. With Portrait and Other Illustrations (no place: publisher not stated, no date) Facsimile reprint of the 1915 edition, published by John Bale, Sons & Danielsson, Ltd.  208 x 146 mm; saddle-stitched pictorial card wrappers; pp. 79; photographs.  Fine condition.  Dalton died as a result of wounds sustained during German shelling of Verneuil.  The memoir moves from the circumstances of his passing to his early life, service in India, Sierra Leone, and during the Anglo-Boer War.  Letters from the Natal Front detail Dalton’s experiences there, in the efforts to relieve Ladysmith.  He was severely wounded at Chieveley, spending time in hospital at Mooi River, followed by a lengthy trip to Cape Town, and return to England in mid-1900.  “On March 16, 1901, the Arnott Gold Medal for distinguished gallantry in the field was conferred on him by the Irish Medical School and Graduate Association, this being the first award made.”  Dalton’s subsequent tour of service included spells in Sierra Leone, South Africa, and Aden.  The 1915 original edition is not listed in Hackett, but appears in Fred R. Van Hartesveldt’s ‘The Boer War: Historiography and Annotated Bibliography’. £15.00

MINING

de Villiers, J. E.: The Mineralogy of the Barberton Gold Deposits / Die mineralogie van die Barbertonse goudafsettings (Pretoria: Union of South Africa, Department of Mines, 1957) 240 x 153 mm; side-stitched printed blue card wrappers; pp. 60; tables; photographs.  Trace of foxing to wrappers, occasional fox spot elsewhere.  Very good condition.  Bilingual text (English and Afrikaans).  “In 1947 the Union Department of Mines instituted an investigation of the deposits of gold ore in the Barberton District, Eastern Transvaal.  The Division of the Government Mining Engineer undertook the prospecting work in conjunction with the Geological Survey which was responsible for the geological mapping and study of the minerals. … The present study aims at giving a concise account of the results of the mineralogical investigation.” £15.00

Kemp, P. H.: Hydrobiological Studies on the Tugela River System, Part VI – Acidic Drainage from Mines in the Natal Coalfields (The Hague: Dr. W. Junk Publishers, 1967) Offprint from ‘Hydrobiologia’ XXIX, Fasc. 3-4.  243 x 159 mm; original green stitched printed wrappers; pp. [393-425]; tables; maps; diagrams.  Wrappers slightly sunned; hand-stamp of Oceanographic Research Institute to upper cover.  Very good condition.  “It is the purpose of the present paper to present a brief review of the nature and origin of acidic coal mine drainage and to record the results of further field studies that have been carried out in the coal mining areas of Natal.” £10.00

Matthews, J. W.: Incwadi Yami, or Twenty Years’ Personal Experience in South Africa(Johannesburg: Africana Book Society, 1976) Africana Reprint Library, Volume Nine.  Facsimile of the 1887 Rogers & Sherwood edition, with new foreword and index and additional illustrations.  8vo; blue pictorial rexine blocked in gilt and black; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; tinted top edge; pictorial endpapers; pp. xxiv + 542 + xv, incl. index; liberally illustrated with plates and text illustrations.  Near fine condition.  ‘The author left England in 1864, having been appointed Surgeon to the Tugela, bound for Port Natal with emigrants, and on his arrival in South Africa he succeeded in obtaining the post of District Surgeon to Victoria County (Natal).  Dr. Matthews proceeded to the diamond fields in 1871; he had already sent up a party to work in the mines, in charge of Mr. G. J. Lee, afterwards Chairman of the Kimberley Mining Board, a gentleman well known as an expert geologist.  The author was for many years closely identified with every social and political movement on the Fields, and his description of the diamond fields, and his references to the “Illicit Diamond Trade,” are particularly interesting.  There are particulars of “The Kimberley Company and Share Mania of 1881,” “The early History of the Diamond Fields,” “An account of the Black Flag Riot,” together with sketches of the author’s adventures in Basutoland, Swaziland, and the Transvaal, where he eventually settled.’ – Mendelssohn £25.00

Pieterse, D[aniel] J[ohannes]: Die geskiedenis van die mynindustrie in Transvaal, 1836-1886 [1943 Archives Year Book for South African History, Sixth Year] (Pretoria: Ministry of the Interior, Union of South Africa, [1945]) WITH ‘Armesorg aan die Kaap onder die Kompanjie, 1652-1795’, by Maria M. Marais.  Archives Year Book for South African History, Sixth Year.  Large 8vo; original dark green cloth, lettered in gilt on spine; pp. (xii) + 216.  Cloth a little worn, with slight fraying to tale of backstrip; corners turned; light browning; some foxing to edges; a few small marginal annotations; occasional fingering.  Good condition.  The first 70 or so pages are devoted to social services, such as they were, during the Dutch East India Company’s tenure at the Cape, and the balance of the book considers the history of mining in the Transvaal up to the discovery of gold on the Witwatersrand.  Afrikaans text. £20.00

NATURAL HISTORY

Arnold, G., and C. L. Boulenger: On a Freshwater Medusa from the Limpopo River System, with a Note on a Parasitic Infusorian (London: Zoological Society of London, 1915) Inscribed ‘K. H. Barnard fr. G. A.” to upper cover.  Keppel Barnard was a famous taxonomist and curator of the South African Museum.  George Arnold was curator of the Rhodesia Museum.  Offprint from the ‘Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London,’ March 1915.  222 x 152 mm; printed blue wrappers; pp. [71-76]; plate.  Earlier owner’s name, with institutional hand-stamp and code label, to upper cover; wrappers somewhat foxed, some foxing elsewhere.  Good to very good.  Identification of a freshwater jellyfish species from the tributaries of the Limpopo. £10.00

Bedford, G. A. H.: Anoplura from South African Hosts (Pretoria: Division of Veterinary Services and Animal Industry, Union of South Africa,1919) Author’s presentation inscription to upper cover reads:  “Mr. F. W. FitzSimons / With the compliments of / G. A. H. Bedford.”  Offprint from departmental report; 246 x 152 mm; side-stitched wrappers; pp. [711-736]; four plates.  Some foxing, and a penned code, to wrappers; slight curl to bottom forecorner; staples a little rusted.  Good to very good.  Uncommon.  Contribution to the literature of sucking lice, inscribed to one of South Africa’s best-known naturalists. £12.50

Gilchrist, J. D. F.: Report of the Marine Biologist for the Year 1898 (Cape Town: W. A. Richards & Sons, Government Printers, 1899) 8vo; black cloth over boards, re-backed in black rexine; lettered in gilt on spine and upper cover; speckled edges; pp. (iv) + 362; tables in text; plate and several coastal charts, incl. folding.  Cloth rather fishmothed; particularly to edges; regular browning throughout; a little spotting.  Fair to good.  Uncommon.  This work, produced for the Department of Agriculture of the Cape colony, commences with a journal detailing the investigations of the government trawler ‘Pieter Faure’ between January 5 and December 31, 1898, between Simonstown and East London.  This is followed by observations and statistics relating to marine life from along the coastline, information on inland fisheries, and the ‘Report of the Select Committee on the Fishing Industry.’  ‘The outstanding feature of the year’s work is the discovery of a large deep-sea fishing area near Mossel Bay, being a part of the great Agulhas Bank.  In last year’s Report an account was given of the discovery of certain rich fishing grounds, and it was demonstrated that, in spite of statements to the contrary, there was within easy reach of Cape Town an excellent trawling ground.  But it was also pointed out that, “after careful examination, we have found no regular deep-sea fishing ground for trawling.”  This has at last been discovered, and may be the basis of a great fishing industry.  Over one thousand square miles of this ground have been examined carefully, and we can now confidently assert that there is here a great source of wealth and food supply for the Colony.  This discovery has only been made possible by the employment of a vessel of suitable strength and equipment and of a crew well acquainted with the work, and the result has more than justified the expenditure incurred.’ £60.00

Gilchrist, J. D. F.: Reproduction by Transverse Fission in Phoronopsis (London: [Offprint from] The Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science, 1919) Author’s presentation inscription to K. H. Barnard on upper cover.  J. D. F. Gilchrist was marine biologist of the Cape of Good Hope, curator of the South African Museum, and Professor of Zoology at the South African College (University of Cape Town).  When Gilchrist left his post at the South African Museum, he was succeeded by Dr Keppel H. Barnard.  Gilchrist, as collector, and Barnard, as taxonomist, collaborated on many projects.  The present publication, inscribed by the one for the other, is a record of their close association.  243 x 158 mm; paper wrappers with printed label; pp. [493-507]; folding plate.  Wrappers a little foxed and tanned, occasional fox spot elsewhere.  Very good condition.  Description of asexual reproduction in a genus of horseshoe worms. £15.00

Gilchrist, J. D. F.: On Two New Species of Ptychodera (P. proliferans and P. natalensis) (London: Trustees of the South African Museum, 1908) Offprint from the ‘Annals of the South African Museum,’ Vol. VI., Part II, of December 1908.  Signed on the upper cover by K. H. Barnard, who succeeded J. D. F. Gilchrist as curator of the South African Museum.  The two collaborated on many projects in marine biology.  253 x 156 mm; original pink printed wrappers; pp. [207-212].  Wrappers somewhat tanned; pages browned.  Good.  The author deals with two species of acorn worm he discovered in Cape and Natal waters. £10.00

Gilchrist, J. D. F.: The Life History of Distoma luteum n. sp., with Notes on Some Cercariae and Rediae found in S. Africa (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1918) Author’s signed presentation inscription to upper cover, along with signature of earlier owner K. H. Barnard.  J. D. F. Gilchrist was marine biologist of the Cape of Good Hope, curator of the South African Museum, and Professor of Zoology at the South African College (University of Cape Town).  When Gilchrist left his post at the South African Museum, he was succeeded by Dr Keppel H. Barnard.  Gilchrist, as collector, and Barnard, as taxonomist, collaborated on many projects.  The present publication, inscribed by the one for the other, is a record of their close association. Offprint from ‘Parasitology’, Vol. X, No. 3, April 29, 1918.  260 x 181 mm; original blue printed wrappers; pp. [311-319].  Wrappers somewhat foxed, with a little wear at head of spine; occasional fox spot.  Good to very good.  Important pioneering study of the life cycle of liver flukes.  “Some years ago, in endeavouring to obtain various stages in the life history of the liver-fluke in South Africa for teaching purposes, I found that, although the parasite is fairly common on some farms in this country, the intermediate host had not yet been definitely ascertained.  In Europe, as is well known, the intermediate host is the fresh-water snail Limnaea truncatula, but this species has not been recorded with certainty from South Africa.  The commonest fresh-water snail here is Physa (Isidora) tropica and a preliminary examination of a few specimens of this mollusc from Muizenberg Lake revealed abundant stages of fluke very closely resembling those of the liver-fluke.  Additional specimens procured from the neighbourhood also afforded abundant material of the same stages.  The only difficulty in accepting this as a solution of the problem was that, though placed in the most favourable conditions, the free swimming form (cercaria) was never observed to encyst.” £17.50

Gunn, Mary, and Enid du Plessis: The Flora Capensis of Jakob and Johann Philipp Breyne(Johannesburg: Ad. Donker for The Brenthurst Press, 1978) Brenthurst First Series, number 4.  Standard edition limited to 850 copies.  4to; original brown cloth, with gilt-on-black title to spine; pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; tinted top edge; pp. 218; ninety plates, largely full-colour, with descriptions to facing verso in each case.  Very light stippling to top edges of boards; occasional fox spot.  Near fine condition.  “Jakob Breyne (1637—1697) and his son Johann Philipp (1680—1764) were wealthy merchants of Danzig who collected rare and exotic plants. In 1724 Johann Philipp had 86 watercolour drawings of plants from the Cape of Good Hope bound in an album. All the drawings are unsigned and were executed by several artists. The Cape is well known for its profusion of indigenous wild flowers, and these centuries-old paintings are here reproduced for the first time, together with an introduction, and notes on each plant depicted.” £95.00

Hasse, C., and others: Das Natürliche System der Elasmobranchier auf grundlage des Baues und der Entwicklung ihrer Wirbelsäule. Eine Morphologische und Paläontologische Studie (Jena: Verlag von Gustav Fischer, 1882) Three folio volumes in wrappers (360 x 278 mm); pp. (ii) + 94 + (iil), (ii) + [95-180] + (xli), vi + [181-284] + (lxviii); a total of forty plates, some of which in colours.  Wrappers torn and worn, with stamps, codes and labels of ‘Oceanographic Research Institute’; corners bumped; several leaves unopened and their corners somewhat curled; foxing to edges, and a little elsewhere; archival tape repairs to wrappers and spines; binding loose in all cases.  The first two in the series have the original printed wrappers, and the third volume has a later replacement cover.  Hasse’s study of the spines of elasmobranch fishes – the cartilaginous group including sharks and rays – is considered an important advance in our understanding of these creatures.  The plates are excellent.  German text. £75.00

Herre, H.: The Genera of the Mesembryanthemaceae (Cape Town: Tafelberg, 1971) Bookplate of renowned botanist Helen J. Vanderplank to front free endpaper.  4to; original green cloth, lettered in gilt on spine; laminated pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. (xii) + 316; full-colour plates, with distribution map and description to facing verso in each case; diagrams and monochrome photographs (several of prominent botanists asssociated with the Mesems); identification key.  Dustwrapper rather tanned, and a bit edgeworn (earlier owner’s tape reinforcing to reverse); gift inscription to front pastedown; library code to tail of spine, codes and stamps, incl. deaccession stamps, also to pastedowns and prelims.; errata slip tipped in with the key; occasional fox spot.  Good.  Ex-library.  ‘The book gives an unsurpassed review of this wide and varied family to the layman and the garden enthusiast who wish to know and grow the strange, succulent “stone flowers” or the beautifully flowering “vygies” or mesems, and it tells him at a glance where these plants are to be found in nature.  The foundations for the text and for the striking botanical drawings in this book were separately laid as long as a half century ago; it was built on two lives largely spent on research into mesembryanthema.’ £20.00

Linder, H. P., and H. Kurzweil, and others: Orchids of Southern Africa (Rotterdam: A. A. Balkema, 1999) 4to; original purple cloth, lettered in gilt on spine, with gilt publisher’s device to upper cover; laminated pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. XII + 492, incl. index; full-colour photographic plates; distribution maps; line drawings.  Fine condition.  “Orchids are a significant component of the extraordinarily rich southern African flora.  The remarkable and frequently bizarre floral structures of many southern African and particularly Cape orchids are among the most complicated to be found in the entire orchid family.  This, together with the aesthetic appeal and the intriguing pollination systems, has generated a strong interest in these orchids, both among botanists and hobbyists.  This book describes all 466 species in 52 genera which occur in the southern African region, with most of the species illustrated with colour plates, and most of the genera by black and white line drawings.  The geographical ranges of the species are shown by distribution maps, and the pollinator, habitat, flowering time and other information about the species given.” £175.00

Mortensen, Dr. Th.: On the “Solitaire” of the Island of Rodriguez (Leiden: N.V. Boekhandel en Drukkerij, formerly E. J. Brill, 1933) Offprint from ARDEA, year XXII, instalment –2, 1933.  Author’s presentation inscription to K. H. Barnard, curator of the South African Museum, on upper cover.  245 x 161 mm; printed saddle-stitched wrappers; pp. [21-29]; monochrome illustrations in text; plates.  Wrappers somewhat browned; a little foxing.  Good to very good condition.  In this work, the author provides evidence of the existence of the Solitaire, a flightless bird akin to the dodo, which was found on Rodriguez (Rodrigues) until the end of the 1700s. £17.50

Pennington, Ken, with C.G.C. Dickson and D.M. Kroon: Pennington’s Butterflies of Southern Africa (Johannesburg: Ad. Donker, 1978) Bookplate of renowned botanist Helen J. Vanderplank to front free endpaper.  4to; original blue boards, with gilt-on-navy title to spine; laminated pictorial dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; pp. 670; frontis. portrait; 198 full-colour plates, with descriptions to facing verso in each case; large, folding map.  Light wear to head and tail of dustwrapper’s spine panel, with discreet archival tape repairs to reverse; bottom edges of boards very lightly rubbed.  Near fine condition.  “This is the first definitive work devoted to Southern African butterflies.  Illustrated with 198 plates in full colour, this comprehensive record of no less than 780 species is unique in the world of Lepidoptera.  Most of the butterflies are depicted life-size.  There are also superb reproductions of 38 hand-painted life cycles of Hesperiidae by Gowan C. Clark, the renowned natural history artist and Lepidopterist.  The text includes known distributional records, field observations, times of appearance, amongst other interesting data.  A detailed index provides easy access to all species.  An accurate botanical list of known foodplants utilized by larvae of these butterflies broadens the scope of this volume.  Family, genus, species and author of every plant are tabulated against each insect.  Scientific abbreviations of titles of journals and other publications cited are listed separately with expanded titles appended.  A large fold-out map and select bibliography complete the contents.  PENNINGTON’S BUTTERFLIES OF SOUTHERN AFRICA is a valuable and essential reference work in the field of natural history of Southern Africa.” £85.00

Ridewood, W. G.: A New Species of Cephalodiscus (C. gilchristi) from the Cape Seas (Cape Town: Cape Times Ltd., 1906) Offprint from “Marine Investigations, South Africa,” Vol IV.  242 x 154 mm; side-stitched printed blue wrappers; pp. [173-192] + plates; diagrams in text.  Wrappers partially sunned; occasional fox spot.  Very good condition.  Uncommon.  This work considers the seventh species in the order Cephalodiscida to have been discovered until that time.  Several other species have since become known. £10.00

OUTDOORS

Olivier, Willie & Sandra: Staproetes in Suid-Afrika (Cape Town: Struik, 2003) 244 x 170 mm; laminated pictorial wrappers; pp. 304, incl. index; full-colour plates; maps.  Very good condition.  Afrikaans text.  “Staproetes in Suid-Afrika sal vir elke voetslaner van onskatbare waarde wees.  Al die vernaamste voetslaanpaaie in die land is ingesluit en by elkeen is daar ‘n duidelike beskrywing van die roete.  Verder word die afstand en die tyd wat nodig is om dit af te lê, asook inligting oor akkomodasie op die roete, geriewe wat verskaf word en ander beskikbare aktiwiteite, soos abseil en duik aangedui.  By elke inskrywing word ook adresse vir besprekings verskaf.  Hierdie omvattende Suid-Afrikaanse voetslaangids bied die nuutste beskikbare inligting en is onontbeerlik vir enigeen wat die land te voet wil verken.” £15.00

PALEONTOLOGY

Haughton, Sidney Henry: Reptilian Remains from the Karroo Beds of East Africa (London: Longmans, 1924) Signed “With the author’s compliments” to upper cover.  Offprint from the ‘Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society’ (vol. lxxx, pt. 1, pp. 1-11 & pls. i-ii.).  218 x 141 mm; printed pink stitched wrappers; pp. 11 + (i); plates.  Slight damp-stain to fore-edge of plates; a little spotting.  Very good condition.  “The fossil remains described and discussed in this paper were taken from about the middle of the Karroo Beds near Tanga, on the coast of the Tanganyika Territory, by Mr. F. P. Mennell, F.G.S., who was good enough to forward the specimens to me for examination. … It is not necessary to dwell on the importance of Mr. Mennell’s discovery.  From extra-South African areas very few of its animals have been found within the boundaries of Gondwanaland; that some of them were spread outside its confines is well-known; but hitherto there has been a big geographical gap between the South African localities yielding Gondwana fauna and those of Europe.  This discovery marks the first step in the bridging of that gap … ” £12.50

Pycraft, W. P.: On the Calvaria found at Boskop, Transvaal, in 1913, and its Relationship to Cromagnard and Negroid Skulls (London: Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, 1925) Reprinted from the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. LV, January-June, 1925.  275 x 189 mm; original green printed stitched wrappers; pp. (ii) + [179-198]; diagrams in text.  Lower cover detached; upper cover partially sunned, with museum hand-stamp; museum hand-stamp likewise to title page; foxed.  Fair condition. £10.00

RELIGION

Newton, Sir Isaac: Observations upon the Prophecies of Daniel. A new edition, with the citations translated, and notes by P. Borthwick, Esq. of Downing College, Cambridge (London: James Nisbet, 1831) Bishop Robert Gray’s copy, signed ‘Rbt Gray / Bristol 1834’ on the front free endpaper.  8vo; contemporary cloth-backed papered boards, with paper title label to spine; pp. (viii) + xvi + 250 + publisher’s catalogue.  Boards somewhat mottled and rubbed, and a little chipped to edges; corners turned; backstrip slightly worn and title label eroded; hinges just starting; some foxing throughout; ‘Cape Town Diocesan Library’ stamps to pastedowns and title page.  A good copy.  Besides being one of the greatest scientific minds of his or any other age, Sir Isaac Newton was a rigorous Biblical scholar.  Many of his conclusions, only fully published long after his death, did not harmonise with official Church doctrine.  They included a rejection of the Athanasian Creed, and a belief that the Millennial Rule of God’s Kingdom would bring peace to earth’s inhabitants for all eternity.  In this regard, he wrote: “The earth shall continue to be inhabited by mortals after the day of judgment and that not only for a 1000 years but even for ever.”  Newton’s Observations upon the Prophecies of Daniel and the Apocalypse of St John was first published in 1733.  Robert Gray (1809-1872), first Anglican bishop of Cape Town, was the son of Robert Gray, bishop of Bristol.  Gray, who had Tractarian leanings, accepted the new bishopric of Cape Town in 1847.  His name is perhaps most closely associated with the prosecution of the Colenso case, the reverberations of which were felt throughout the Anglican world.  It is interesting that a figure such as Gray, generally regarded as representing orthodoxy, should have had in his library a work so at odds with the position of the Church.  Gray’s inscription is dated 1834, the year of his ordination as a priest. £395.00

SOUTH AFRICAN HISTORY

Cronjé, G.: Afrika Sonder die Asiaat – Die Blywende Oplossing van Suid-Afrika se Asiatevraagstuk(Johannesburg: Publicité Handelsreklamediens, 1946) 8vo; original dark green cloth, lettered in black on spine and upper cover; pp. 206; tables.  Tail of backstrip turned; some browning and foxing to endpapers and edges, earlier owner’s name on front free endpaper.  Good to very good condition.  Afrikaans text.  Early expression of apartheid ideology by a professor of sociology at the University of Pretoria, continuing the arguments in his ” ‘n Tuiste vir die Nageslag”.  Here the author treats South Africa’s Indian population as somewhat different to other racial groups, which, he argues, have a claim to continuing settlement on the African continent.  Those of Asian ancestry, however, should be repatriated, he contends.  “Kom ons egter by die Asiate- of Indiërvraagstuk, dan kry ons te make met ‘n rassegroep wat uitheems is en uitheems bly; en wat ‘n steeds groter bedreiging word vir die inheemse rassegroepe, d.w.s. die nie-blankes sowel as die blankes.  Dit moet by die bespreking van hierdie vraagstuk steeds in gedagte gehou word. … Wat die Indiërs aan Suid-Afrika laat vaskleef, is nie hulle liefde vir hierdie land as vaderland nie maar wel die ekonomiese welvaart en ekonomiese vooruitsigte wat hulle hier geniet in vergelyking met dié wat Indië, hulle eintlike tuiste, vir hulle bied. … Laat ons egter in aansluiting hierby die standpunt stel dat die enigste werklik finale en blywende oplossing van die Asiatevraagstuk niks anders as algehele repatriasie sal wees nie.  Wanneer die probleem van alle kante in oënskou geneem word, kan geen ander konlusie as dit vasgestel word nie.” £35.00

Molema, S[eetsele] M[odiri]: Chief Moroka. His Life, His Times, His Country and His People (Cape Town: Methodist Publishing House and Book Depot, [1951]) First edition.  Crown 8vo; original blue cloth, lettered in black on spine and upper cover; endpaper maps; pp. (x) + 210, incl. index; monochrome illustrations; genealogical table.  Cloth a little rubbed and mottled, and partially sunned; school library hand-stamps to front pastedown and free endpaper verso; some foxing to endpapers and edges, occasional fox spot elsewhere.  Good to very good condition.  Exceedingly uncommon, especially in first edition form.  “For much of his life Moroka was destined to be in close contact with the white man.  The first Europeans whom Moroka met were the Wesleyan missionaries, Samuel Broadbent and Thomas Hodgson.  This historic meeting took place on 13.1.1823 during the chieftainship of Moroka’s father, and that day was the commencement of the recorded history of the baRolong.  In 1824 Hodgson was transferred to Cape Town and in his place came James Archbell, who had led the baRolong to a new Platberg at Thaba Nchu.  It was in the company of Archbell and his colleague, the Rev. John Edwards, that the Seleka baRolong moved eastwards along the Modder river, finally arriving near the banks of the Caledon river in December 1833. … When Moroka had spent barely two years at Thaba Nchu with his people, they met the Voortrekkers, the second type of white man beside whom the were destined to live in the future. … The third and fourth trek parties … too, were received with the warm hospitality that had by then come to be associated with Moroka’s name. … His tombstone has on it a tribute to Moroka as a leader of a small tribe which built a great name for itself, ‘who nurtured the baRolong kingdom and piloted it through divers tribulations during a period of fifty years, leaving it fully established.'”  – DSAB I, pp. 559-60 £50.00

Schreiner, Olive: Thoughts on South Africa (Johannesburg: Africana Book Society, 1976) Africana Reprint Library, Volume Ten.  Text facsimile of the Unwin 1923 edition, with a new foreword by Richard Rive, and illustrations.  8vo; white rexine, lettered in silver gilt on spine; pictorial endpapers; pictorial dustwrapper (housed in removable protector); pp. xxii + 398; plates.  Near fine condition.  “One of the most mature and finest pieces of polemical writing to come out of South Africa, Olive Schreiner’s Thoughts on South Africa comprises eight essays and four short appendixes which were edited and prepared for posthumous publication by her husband, Samuel Cronwright-Schreiner, in 1923, more than thirty years after most of the essays were written. … Of the twelve separate pieces, six are concerned with the Boer, two each with the fauna and natural features of South Africa and the treatment of black and mixed people, and one each with the Englishman and the South African nation.  In this work of remarkable vision, Olive Schreiner foresaw the developments which led to the Anglo-Boer War; indeed, answers are even now being sought to problems she posed nearly a century ago.” £20.00

SOUTH AFRICAN LITERATURE

Schreiner, Olive: Three Dreams in a Desert. Under a Mimosa-Tree (Boston: Sarah E. Holmes, 1897) 180 x 117 mm; original printed, stitched wrappers; yapp edges; pp. 14.  Wrappers a little soiled; earlier owner’s hand-stamp to inside of upper cover.  Very good.  Not in SABIB in this form.  Uncommon.  “She was a distinguished writer of allegories, or what she called ‘dreams’.  Dreams was published during her lifetime (London, 1891) and Stories, Dreams and Allegories posthumously (1923).  In spite of their outward simplicity these literary tableaus – in which symbols of temptation and virtue play major roles – have considerable subtlety and force.” – DSAB I, p. 699.  ‘Three Dreams in a Desert’ first appeared in the maverick ‘Quarterly Review’, being republished separately by Sarah Elizabeth Holmes in 1887, before its inclusion in ‘Dreams’ (1891).  Holmes, a pioneer of American feminism, reissued the work in this version of 1897.  In ‘Sarah Elizabeth Holmes: The Study of a Silenced Woman’, Wendy McElroy acknowledges the significance of this publication:  “Before appearing within ‘Liberty’ in her own voice, Holmes made significant contributions to the literature of liberty through her translations and her publication of the works of others.  In 1887, for example, Holmes published Olive Schreiner’s feminist prose-poem ‘Three Dreams in a Desert’ … ” £75.00

Scully, William Charles: Between Sun and Sand. A Tale of an African Desert (Cape Town: J. C. Juta & Co., [1912]) Crown 8vo; original brown cloth, with blind-stamped boards, and spine lettered in gilt; pp. (xii) + 294.  Slightest wear to head of lower joint.  An outstanding copy of this attractive edition.  The first edition of this work was issued by Methuen in 1898.  Contrary to the publication date provided in Hosken and elsewhere, ‘A South African Bibliography’, based on the acquisition dates of both the British Museum and South African Library copies, gives 1912 as the publication date of the Juta edition.  (SABIB IV, p. 181; Hosken, p. 178)  The book reflects “the hardships suffered by nomadic farmers in Namaqualand and Bushmanland”, and is “an episodic novel, notable for the creation of some memorable bushveld characters … ” – Adey, et al: Companion to South African English Literature, p. 177.  “His particular literary merit lies in the integrity with which he recorded the contemporary scene.  A lifetime spent in the Cape civil service gave him an intimate knowledge of South Africa and its peoples; the extent to which his books reflect this knowledge makes them a source of valuable information for the historian and sociologist.” – DSAB I, p. 705. £25.00

TRANSVAAL

Cohen, Louis: Reminiscences of Johannesburg and London (Johannesburg: Africana Book Society, 1976) Africana Reprint Library, Volume Seven.  Text facsimile of the Robert Holden edition of 1924, with a new foreword by Eric Rosenthal.  8vo; blue rexine lettered in gilt on spine; tinted top edge; pictorial endpapers; pictorial dustwrapper (housed in removable protector); pp. xvii + (i) + [6-316], incl. index; colour frontis., with tissue-guard; plates.  Spine panel of dustwrapper a little sunned.  Near fine condition.  “Reminiscences of Johannesburg and London is an entertainingly caustic commentary on the South African Rand and its personalities during the robust early years.  Louis Cohen, journalist, sometime member of the Johannesburg Stock Exchange and a cousin of Barney Barnato, was a lively individualist who knew everyone who mattered in the Golden City and many who didn’t.  In this book he writes about share-dealing and boxing, horse-racing, theatre, the scandals and the stimulating social and business life of nineteenth century Johannesburg.  Above all he writes about people – the politicians, the entrepreneurs, the actors, the sportsmen and the ‘characters’.  Biased and opinionated though he undoubtedly is, he manages to recapture in fine style the mood of a fascinating era.” £20.00

De Waal, J. B.: Die rol van João Albasini in die geskiedenis van die Transvaal [Archives Year Book for South African History, Sixteenth Year, Volume I] (Pretoria: Ministry of Education, Arts and Science, Union of South Africa, 1953) WITH ‘Die verhouding tussen Kerk en Staat in die Republiek van die Oranje-Vrystaat (1854-1902)‘, by J. D. Kriel, AND, ‘Beutler’s Expedition into the Eastern Cape, 1752‘, by Vernon S. Forbes.  Archives Year Book for South African History, Sixteenth Year, Volume I.  Large 8vo; original dark green cloth, lettered in gilt on spine; pp. (xii) + 323; portrait plate; five maps, largely folding.  Cloth ever so slightly rubbed at extremities; light browning; trace of foxing.  Very good condition.  The first 160 or so pages are devoted to De Waal’s work on Albasini, the next 115 or so pages to Kriel’s analysis of Church-State relations in the Orange Free State Republic, and around 50 pages are given to the Forbes account of Beutler’s journey.  Two works in Afrikaans, and one in English. £30.00

Krüger, D. W.: Die weg na die see [Archives Year Book for South African History, Volume I, Part I](Cape Town: Archives Department, Union of South Africa, 1938) WITH, ‘Het invoeren van de slavernij aan de Kaap’, by W. Blommaert, AND ‘The Destruction of Records in South Africa’, by P. J. Venter.   Archives Year Book for South African History, Volume I, Part I.  278 x 180 mm; original printed wrappers; pp. (x) + 239.  Wrappers partially sunned, corners curled, with penned code and label remnant to backstrip; archival tape reinforcing to head and tail of spine; edges foxed, occasional foxing elsewhere.  Good.  The Blommaert piece on slavery at the Cape fills the first thirty or so pages, and is in Dutch.  Krüger’s important work covers the land-locked Boers’ obsession with access to the east coast until 1877, and has particular reference to their relations with the Portuguese.  It is in Afrikaans, and takes up two hundred pages.  The short essay at the conclusion is concerned with the archivist’s perennial worry about the preservation of documents. £35.00

TRAVEL

Ferreira, O.J.O.: Serpa Pinto amongst Boer and Brit: His Travels through the Transvaal and Natal, 1879 (Jeffreys Bay: Tormentoso, 2012) 238 x 144 mm; laminated pictorial wrappers; pp. (viii) + 174, incl. index; numerous monochrome contemporary illustrations; maps.  As new.  “The Portuguese explorer, Alexandre da Rocha de Serpa Pinto (1846-1900), undertook a journey from Angola to Natal in 1877-1879.  On the way he met Boers and missionaries, and stayed for a while in Pretoria and Durban.  During his travels he made careful notes of his impressions and experiences in his travel-journal.  From a cultural historical point of view his description of the character and lifestyle of the Boers, as well as the social life in Pretoria during the period of the British annexation (1877-1881) is of special importance.  Serpa Pinto, being Portuguese, takes a different view from those contemporary British travellers and Dutch visitors to the Transvaal who recorded their impressions of the Boers.  His travel-journal – published in Portuguese and English as early as 1881 – contains significant historical and cultural historical facts, but these have seldom been explored by South African researchers.” £15.00

Joubert, Elsa: Die Nuwe Afrikaan. ‘n Reis deur Angola (Cape Town: Tafelberg, 1974) 8vo; original black boards; laminated dustwrapper; endpaper map; pp. 157; plates.  Spine panel of dustwrapper a bit sunned; short, closed tear to top edge of upper panel; previous owner’s hand-stamp to front free endpaper; sporadic, moderate foxing.  Very good condition.  Uncommon account of travel in Angola during the final days of Portuguese rule.  The same author provided a suspenseful fictional account of tension between black and white in Angola in ‘Ons wag op die Kaptein’.  Afrikaans text.  ‘In September-Oktober 1973 besoek Elsa Joubert Angola, dié land wat so intiem verbind is met die lotgevalle van Suid-Afrika. … Sy reis per vliegtuig, per motor, per trein, per jeep.  Sy besoek die noorde met sy dreigende, broeiende oerwoude waar die terroriste-gevaar skuil.  Met die gevaarlike “koffiepad” besoek sy  Quitexe, die dorpie waar die ergste moorde in 1961 plaasgevind het; sy besoek versterkte plase met hul hoë draadversperrings en spreiligte.  Sy reis deur die barre suide wat soveel nader, meer verwant aan Suid-Afrika is. … Uit alles wat sy hoor, sien en ervaar, is dit duidelik dat dinge aan die gis is.  Verandering moet kom.  En met wat in 1974 in Angola en Portugal gebeur het, is hierdie vermoede bevestig.  Die hele bestel het verander.’

Lewis, A. D.: Colony and Protectorate of Kenya. Report on Irrigation, Water Supplies for Stock, Water Law, Etc. December, 1925 (London: The Crown Agents for the Colonies, [1926?]) Folio (335 x 214 mm); printed pink papered boards; original cloth back with simple duct tape reinforcing; pp. 99; six large, folding diagrams or maps; some tables in text.  Boards foxed, somewhat bowed, and partially sunned; foxing throughout, which is generally moderate, though more pronounced to outermost leaves and edges.  Uncommon.  Various OCLC listings provide publication dates between 1925 and 1927, though the earliest date seems improbable given that the charts are dated December 1925.  ‘In a letter dated June 25th, 1925, the Acting Governor of Kenya Colony asked the Governor-General of the Union of South Africa whether an expert irrigation officer could be seconded for a period of six months in order “to explore the possibilities of irrigation schemes,” “make preliminary investigations into local conditions and advise on the best course of action to be taken and also generally on Water Laws.”  In reply, the Governor-General offered the services of the Director of Irrigation for a period of two months only, which offer was accepted by the Acting Governor.  I arrived at Mombasa on September 8th … I then proceeded to Nairobi, and from there undertook five “safaris” before finally leaving Mombasa on November 7th.  The safaris were – (1) to the Thika River irrigation scheme, and through the Ukamba Reserve to beyond Kitui and Ikutha, and to Machakos and beyond by motor and on foot; (2) across the Rift Valley, and northwards to Rumuruti; then to Nanyuki and south through Nyeri and Fort Hall; (3) along the railway line from Kiu to Tsavo River by trolley, branching off on foot and horseback and by motor to investigate possible water supplies within a few miles on either side of the line; (4) to the Masai Reserve in the Rift Valley and beyond Narok to the Loita Plains, and (5) northwards along the coast to Malindi and about 30 miles up the Sabaki River.  Three meetings with district committees or the public were attended at Naivasha, Rumuruti and Thika.’ £50.00

Möller, P.: Journey in Africa Through Angola, Ovampoland and Damaraland (Cape Town: Struik, 1974) Translated from the original Swedish edition of 1899 and annotated by Ione and Jalmar Rudner.  8vo; original brown boards; pictorial dustwrapper; pp. (xiv) + 216, incl. index; plates; folding route map.  Dustwrapper a little sunned on spine panel; some fishmothing to ends of backstrip; light foxing to endpapers.  Very good condition.  “Originally published in Swedish in 1899, this book by the traveller and explorer, Peter August Möller, describes his journey by ox-wagon in Angola, through Ovamboland and Damaraland to Walvis Bay.  The Rudners’ notes augment a wealth of first-hand information about this part of the country as it was at the end of the 19th century.  Particularly interesting are the passages devoted to the native people, the Angola Trekkers and to wild-life.  Also of interest is Möller’s account of the death of Charles John Andersson, the famous naturalist and explorer, as related to him by the pioneer and hunter, Axel Eriksson.  The description of hunts and his photographs of native life are of special interest.  This book is a valuable source of information to students of anthropology, zoology and history.” £25.00

Omer-Cooper, Joseph: Dr. Hugh Scott’s Expedition to Abyssinia. – A Preliminary Investigation of the Freshwater Fauna of Abyssinia (London: Zoological Society of London, 1930) Author’s signed presentation inscription to K. H. Barnard, curator of the South African Museum, on upper cover.  Offprint from the ‘Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London’, 1930, published, May 9th, 1930.  260 x 173 mm; pale blue printed wrappers; pp. [195-207] + plates.  Wrappers somewhat foxed and partially sunned, some foxing elsewhere.  Good condition.  Excellent plates showing remote parts of Abyssinia.  Dr. Hugh Scott “made an expedition to Abssinia in 1926-7, to investigate the entomology of the mountain-forests, etc.  [Joseph Omer-Cooper]  accompanied him for a time in the hope of obtaining material of the freshwater fauna, hitherto almost unknown.  Owing to the excellent manner in which Dr. Scott organised the expedition, the three principal watersheds of the Abyssinian highlands were visited, and [Omer-Cooper] was able to do a certain amount of collecting in all the localities which [he] had planned to examine.” £10.00

Oswald, Felix: Alone in the Sleeping-Sickness Country (London: Kegan Paul, 1923) With a map, and over 70 plates from the author’s photographs.  8vo; original blue cloth rather worn at extremities and very sunned on spine; pp. xii + 219, incl. index; many black-and-white photographic plates, and a large folding map at the rear; scattered light foxing. Good condition.  An account of Dr Oswald’s experiences among the Kavirondo in the area fringing Lake Victoria, and of his fossil-hunting in “the Sleeping-Sickness Country.” £15.00

Rhodes, G. D.: Kenya and Uganda Railway. Report of the Acting General Manager on the Administration of the Railway and Marine Services for the Year Ended 31st December, 1926(Nairobi: Printed by the Government Printer, 1927) 335 x 212 mm; cloth-backed printed blue wrappers; pp. (vi) + 90; diagrams, longitudinal sections, photographs, a plan of Kilindini Harbour Works, and a large, folding map of Kenya Colony.  Wrappers worn, grubby and foxed, endpapers and folding material at the rear likewise rather foxed; moderate foxing throughout; tags for card subdivisions curled and grubby.  Fair condition.  Uncommon.  A fascinating document, providing an overview of the operation of the Uganda Railway, or ‘Lunatic Express’, in the years directly before its assimilation into the Kenya and Uganda Railways and Harbours in 1929.  The plates are of particular interest, and include images of the Company’s steamer service on Lake Kyoga.  Photographs include Kilindini Harbour, Construction Works over the Mpologoma Swamp, Launching Bridge Girders over the Malawa River – Uganda Extension, Lake Kioga (A steamer and lighter caught in the sudd, Cutting sudd preparatory to towing down stream, The vessel S. W. Grant, Namasagali Wharf), Kisumu, and, One of the spirals on the Uasin Gishu section. £40.00

Van der Post, Laurens: Venture to the Interior (London, Chatto & Windus, 1986) “The Collected Works of Laurens van der Post” series; 8vo; original black boards; laminated pictorial dustwrapper; pp. xiv + 241; maps.  Near fine condition.  “Since his first novel, In a Province, was published by The Hogarth Press in 1934, Laurens van der Post’s books have made a profound impact on readers throughout the English-speaking world, and in many foreign-language editions.  One after the other they have been admired for their brilliant descriptive writing, their imaginative insight and their compelling narrative power.  His recent recognition by the Book Marketing Council as one of the twenty ‘Best of British’ writers is but one of countless tributes that have been paid to his work.  Presented together now for the first time, Laurens van der Post’s collected writings reveal as never before the fullness of his perceptive, wise and remarkably consistent vision.  In all of them his inspiration has been that of an adventurous pioneer exploring not just the outward aspects of a turbulent and troubled world but, at a deeper level, the patterns and paradoxes of human life, the myths and dreams of the human mind, the values and cultures of different peoples, the elusive springs of our own being.” £10.00

Walford, G. F.: Arabian Locust Hunter (London: Robert Hale, 1963) 8vo; original dark brown boards, with lettering to spine; pictorial dustwrapper; pp. 176; several plates and two maps.  Dustwrapper a little rubbed and edgeworn, and housed in protector; trace of spotting to edges.  Very good condition, in a strkingly attractive dustwrapper.  “Since ancient times Desert Locusts have swarmed over millions of square miles of Africa and Asia, eating thousands of tons of food daily and leaving a trail of poverty and famine.  It is only recently that modern transport and insecticides have made it possible to attack these pests with some hope of success.  Arabian Locust Hunter is one Englishman’s graphic, personal account of his experiences as a participant in the battle.  Frustrated by the limitations of life in an office in Nairobi, he broke his fetters and almost by accident obtained a post with Desert Locust Control.  He was sent off to Saudi Arabia, issued with transport, rations, and assorted Arabs, and, without previous knowledge or experience, was told to find and kill locusts. … Life was often difficult, but never dull.  His team comprised a bad-tempered Hadhramaut driver; an ex-gaolbird; a one-eyed, dirty Yemenite servant; and a repulsive armed guide.  Their work took them to Waddi Sirhan in North Arabia, where the guide deserted; to the humid Red Sea coast; to the mountains of the Hijaz.  Travelling thousands of miles, battling with transport breakdowns and officials, meeting Arab legionaries, emirs, chain-gang prisoners, and nomads, he had a wonderful opportunity of seeing much of present-day Arabia, as well as observing the remains of her ancient cultures.” £10.00

Wallis, J. P. R. (editor): The Barotseland Journal of James Stevenson-Hamilton 1898-1899 (London: Chatto & Windus, 1953) Central African Archives Oppenheimer Series, Number Seven.  Royal 8vo; original red buckram, lettered in gilt on spine, with gilt Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland crest to upper cover; dustwrapper, housed in removable protector; top edge gilt; pp. xxxv + (i) + 246, incl. index; frontis. portrait and colour plates; some illustrations in text; folding map.  Trace of foxing to edges of dustwrapper and leaves; some leaves unopened.  Very good condition.  “In 1898 a party of British officers, with specially constructed river craft, tried, as Livingstone had done before them, to establish the navigability of the Zambezi, as well as to determine the boundaries of Barotseland and to report on the likeliest route in that part of Africa for Rhodes’ Cape-to-Cairo railway.  The careful diary kept by one member of this party, James Stevenson-Hamilton of the Inniskilling Dragoons, is a remarkable narrative of danger, hardship and achievement. … The diary, here published for the first time, is also valuable historically, for it gives us a detailed picture of the Barotse under their able king, Lewanika, who at his own request had been taken under British protection with a Resident to reassure and advise him.” £45.00

Wallis, J. P. R. (editor): The Northern Goldfields Diaries of Thomas Baines (London: Chatto & Windus, 1946) The Government Archives of Southern Rhodesia Oppenheimer Series, Number Three, consisting of three volumes: Volume One (First Journey 1869-1870), Volume Two (First Journey 1870-1871), Volume Three (Second Journey 1871-1872).  Three royal 8vo volumes; original red buckram, lettered in gilt on spine and with gilt Rhodesia crest to upper cover, the second and third volumes with original dustwrappers; top edges gilt; pp. xxxviii + 278, viii + [279-598], viii + [599-855, incl. index]; several monochrome and colour plates; some illustrations in text; two folding maps in the first volume, one folding map in the second, and a further two maps in the third, one of which is folding.  Dustwrappers a little sunned and somewhat edgeworn, with tape repairs to reverse; scuff to lower panel of one dustwrapper; fore-corners slightly bumped in first and second volumes; occasional fox spot.  Very good condition.  “The best of him is in his voluminous diaries, of which the section relating to his journeyings in Lobengula’s dominions is here for the first time printed.  It shows him one of those sober Englishmen that East Anglia breeds, quiet, competent, self-reliant and friendly, who enjoy doing things for the doing’s sake and are content to let the rest go by. … It is well to remember what this meant in physical effort, when after toilsome days and seeing everything in his camp securely ordered, he would withdraw within himself and by candle or fire light, take his private pleasure in recounting the day’s doings, uninterrupted by the callow quizzings of his young subordinates or the crude puzzlement of his hunter-friends.  Often he wrote till past midnight, though aware that before sunrise he must be up and about, seeing to an early start in the morning coolness.  Through the day he carried with him a cheap little pocket-book, with a hard pencil, to enter brief memoranda for later expansion, or, on occasion, when the native boy who carried his sketch-book lagged too far behind, to make a thumb-nail drawing of some beast killed, or record the markings or gait of zebra or elephant: anything in short that appealed to his indefatigably curious mind.  And always he shows his competence, in a prose style easy and attractive to read and amplified by swift but always illuminating and often engaging insets, which have been here reproduced as typically Bainesian in their ready promptness and illustrative point.” £80.00

Williamson, James A.: The Cabot Voyages and Bristol Discovery Under Henry VII with, The Cartography of the Voyages, by R. A. Skelton (Cambridge, The Hakluyt Society, 1962) Series II, Vol. CXX.  Issued for 1961.  8vo; original blue cloth gilt; pp. xvi + 332, incl. index; monochrome plates; maps, incl. some folding.  Spine gilt dull; endpapers foxed; sporadic light foxing; pages unopened.  Good to very good condition.  “The voyages of John and Sebastian Cabot and their English contemporaries were made, for the most part, in search of a westward passage to Asia, and they resulted in the revelation of North America.  The evidences are printed here, with an indication of their origins.  Some are obscure in meaning, incomplete in statement, or mutually contradictory; and we are left with the certainty that important documents have existed or may now exist, which are still unknown.  Dr Williamson interprets the evidence we have.  Parts of his undertaking are in the nature of detective work and he does not claim that his solutions are final, which would be impossible in the face of new evidence that may at any time occur.  Cabot study is a continuing mental adventure.  The maps are an important category of the evidence.  Mr R. A. Skelton of the British Museum has contributed a treatment of them, authoritative in its explanations, and a valuable admonition on what can and cannot be expected of the material.” £15.00

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